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Article: Role occupancy, role quality, and psychological distress, in Chinese women

TitleRole occupancy, role quality, and psychological distress, in Chinese women
Authors
KeywordsChinese multiple roles and distress
Chinese role quality and adjustment
Chinese women's health
Issue Date2002
PublisherThe Haworth Medical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/WH
Citation
Women And Health, 2002, v. 36 n. 1, p. 49-66 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study explored the associations between role occupancy, role quality and psychological distress in 897 Chinese women in Hong Kong. Results showed that employed as compared to nonemployed women reported a lower level of psychological distress. Never married as compared to married women, and mothers as compared to childless women, did not differ in their levels of psychological symptoms. Correlation results indicated that a net gain of rewards over concerns about social roles was negatively related to psychological distress. The number of social roles was related to the balance between rewards and concerns between social roles, but had no significant association with mental health status of women. Results of the hierarchical regression analyses showed that good mother role quality and the occupancy of the paid worker role were significant predictors of a low level of psychological distress. Findings based on a subsample of employed mothers failed to support the compensatory and spillover hypotheses. Limitations and implications for future studies were discussed. © 2002 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81681
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.337
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.758
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, CSKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, Ten_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, FMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:20:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationWomen And Health, 2002, v. 36 n. 1, p. 49-66en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0363-0242en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81681-
dc.description.abstractThis study explored the associations between role occupancy, role quality and psychological distress in 897 Chinese women in Hong Kong. Results showed that employed as compared to nonemployed women reported a lower level of psychological distress. Never married as compared to married women, and mothers as compared to childless women, did not differ in their levels of psychological symptoms. Correlation results indicated that a net gain of rewards over concerns about social roles was negatively related to psychological distress. The number of social roles was related to the balance between rewards and concerns between social roles, but had no significant association with mental health status of women. Results of the hierarchical regression analyses showed that good mother role quality and the occupancy of the paid worker role were significant predictors of a low level of psychological distress. Findings based on a subsample of employed mothers failed to support the compensatory and spillover hypotheses. Limitations and implications for future studies were discussed. © 2002 by The Haworth Press, Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherThe Haworth Medical Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.haworthpress.com/web/WHen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofWomen and Healthen_HK
dc.subjectChinese multiple roles and distressen_HK
dc.subjectChinese role quality and adjustmenten_HK
dc.subjectChinese women's healthen_HK
dc.titleRole occupancy, role quality, and psychological distress, in Chinese womenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0363-0242&volume=36&issue=1&spage=49&epage=66&date=2002&atitle=Role+occupancy,+role+quality,+and+psychological+distress+in+Chinese+womenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM: amlee@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1300/J013v36n01_04en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12215003en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036040473en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros88868en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036040473&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage49en_HK
dc.identifier.epage66en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000177660000004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, CSK=7404394105en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, T=55222487600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, FM=7102329454en_HK

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