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Article: Managing disturbing snoring with palatal implants: A pilot study

TitleManaging disturbing snoring with palatal implants: A pilot study
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archoto.com
Citation
Archives Of Otolaryngology - Head And Neck Surgery, 2004, v. 130 n. 6, p. 753-758 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene terephthalate implants in the soft palate to modify disturbing snoring. Design: Interventional study, before-after trial. Setting: Referral center, institutional practice, hospitalized care. Patienits: Twelve consecutive patients with disturbing snoring and an apnea-hypopnea index less than 15 per hour and a body mass index of 30 or less were recruited. One patient with no adverse effects was lost to follow-up. Extrusion of implants occurred in 2 patients. Complete data in 9 patients were available for analysis. Intervention: Polyethylene terephthalate implants were inserted in the soft palate. Main Outcome Measures: Safety of the procedure and evaluation of the loudness of snoring by bed partners using a visual analog scale. Results: There were no complications of infection or bleeding. Extrusion of implants occurred in 2 patients with no clinical sequelae. The mean (SD) loudness of snoring at baseline, as assessed by bed partners using a visual analog scale of 0 to 100, was 79 (17.2). This significantly decreased to 48 (20.4) at 3 months (Wilcoxon signed rank test, P=.008). Daytime sleepiness as measured with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale also decreased from an average score of 8.9 at baseline to 5.7 at 3 months (P =.007). There were no significant changes in the apnea-hypopnea index and body mass index from baseline to 3 months' follow-up. Conclusions: Polyethylene terephthalate implants in the soft palate are safe. Snoring decreased significantly at 3 months after surgery. Polyethylene terephthalate implants in the soft palate should be further explored as a treatment for snoring.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81655
ISSN
2014 Impact Factor: 2.327
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWei, WIen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:20:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:20:24Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Otolaryngology - Head And Neck Surgery, 2004, v. 130 n. 6, p. 753-758en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0886-4470en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81655-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene terephthalate implants in the soft palate to modify disturbing snoring. Design: Interventional study, before-after trial. Setting: Referral center, institutional practice, hospitalized care. Patienits: Twelve consecutive patients with disturbing snoring and an apnea-hypopnea index less than 15 per hour and a body mass index of 30 or less were recruited. One patient with no adverse effects was lost to follow-up. Extrusion of implants occurred in 2 patients. Complete data in 9 patients were available for analysis. Intervention: Polyethylene terephthalate implants were inserted in the soft palate. Main Outcome Measures: Safety of the procedure and evaluation of the loudness of snoring by bed partners using a visual analog scale. Results: There were no complications of infection or bleeding. Extrusion of implants occurred in 2 patients with no clinical sequelae. The mean (SD) loudness of snoring at baseline, as assessed by bed partners using a visual analog scale of 0 to 100, was 79 (17.2). This significantly decreased to 48 (20.4) at 3 months (Wilcoxon signed rank test, P=.008). Daytime sleepiness as measured with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale also decreased from an average score of 8.9 at baseline to 5.7 at 3 months (P =.007). There were no significant changes in the apnea-hypopnea index and body mass index from baseline to 3 months' follow-up. Conclusions: Polyethylene terephthalate implants in the soft palate are safe. Snoring decreased significantly at 3 months after surgery. Polyethylene terephthalate implants in the soft palate should be further explored as a treatment for snoring.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Medical Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.archoto.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgeryen_HK
dc.titleManaging disturbing snoring with palatal implants: A pilot studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0886-4470&volume=130&spage=753&epage=758&date=2004&atitle=Managing+disturbing+snoring+with+palatal+implants+-+a+pilot+studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWei, WI: hrmswwi@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWei, WI=rp00323en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1001/archotol.130.6.753en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15210558-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-2642563802en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros93963en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-2642563802&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume130en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage753en_HK
dc.identifier.epage758en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222012900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, WK=7402968844en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWei, WI=7403321552en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK

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