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Article: Transition to psychosis: 6-month follow-up of a Chinese high-risk group in Hong Kong

TitleTransition to psychosis: 6-month follow-up of a Chinese high-risk group in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsHigh-risk
Prediction
Prodrome
Psychosis
Schizophrenia
Issue Date2006
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anp
Citation
Australian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2006, v. 40 n. 5, p. 414-420 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The identification of individuals at high risk of becoming psychotic within the near future creates opportunities for early intervention before the onset of psychosis. This study sets out to identify a group of symptomatic young people in a Chinese population with the high likelihood of transition to psychosis within a follow-up period of 6 months, and to determine the rate of transition to psychosis in this group. Method: Symptomatic individuals with a family history of psychotic disorder, sub-threshold psychotic symptoms or brief transient psychotic symptoms were identified using the operationalized criteria of an 'At Risk Mental State'. The individuals were prospectively assessed monthly on a measure of psychopathology for 6 months. Results: Eighteen out of 62 individuals (29%) made the transition to frank psychosis within a 6 month follow-up period, with the majority occurring within 3 months. In addition, significant differences were found in the intake Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Comprehensive Assessment of 'At Risk Mental State' and Global Assessment of Functioning scores between the group that ultimately became psychotic and the group that did not. Conclusion: The period of the highest risk of transition to psychosis was within the 3 months after the study began. Thus, distressed youths in our outpatient clinic, who meet the high-risk criteria should be monitored most closely in the initial 3 months, particularly those individuals with high levels of psychopathology and functional decline. © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2006 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81649
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.536
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.269
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, MMLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHung, SFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:20:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:20:20Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAustralian And New Zealand Journal Of Psychiatry, 2006, v. 40 n. 5, p. 414-420en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0004-8674en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81649-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The identification of individuals at high risk of becoming psychotic within the near future creates opportunities for early intervention before the onset of psychosis. This study sets out to identify a group of symptomatic young people in a Chinese population with the high likelihood of transition to psychosis within a follow-up period of 6 months, and to determine the rate of transition to psychosis in this group. Method: Symptomatic individuals with a family history of psychotic disorder, sub-threshold psychotic symptoms or brief transient psychotic symptoms were identified using the operationalized criteria of an 'At Risk Mental State'. The individuals were prospectively assessed monthly on a measure of psychopathology for 6 months. Results: Eighteen out of 62 individuals (29%) made the transition to frank psychosis within a 6 month follow-up period, with the majority occurring within 3 months. In addition, significant differences were found in the intake Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Comprehensive Assessment of 'At Risk Mental State' and Global Assessment of Functioning scores between the group that ultimately became psychotic and the group that did not. Conclusion: The period of the highest risk of transition to psychosis was within the 3 months after the study began. Thus, distressed youths in our outpatient clinic, who meet the high-risk criteria should be monitored most closely in the initial 3 months, particularly those individuals with high levels of psychopathology and functional decline. © 2006 The Authors; Journal compilation © 2006 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://informahealthcare.com/anpen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatryen_HK
dc.subjectHigh-risken_HK
dc.subjectPredictionen_HK
dc.subjectProdromeen_HK
dc.subjectPsychosisen_HK
dc.subjectSchizophreniaen_HK
dc.titleTransition to psychosis: 6-month follow-up of a Chinese high-risk group in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0004-8674&volume=40&spage=414&epage=420&date=2005&atitle=Transition+to+psychosis:+6-month+follow+up+of++a+Chinese+high+risk+group+in+Hong+Kong+en_HK
dc.identifier.emailLam, MML: maylam11@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLam, MML=rp00296en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1614.2006.01817.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16683967-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33646174411en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros111164en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33646174411&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume40en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage414en_HK
dc.identifier.epage420en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000237178300007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MML=13106178700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHung, SF=7201936267en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, EYH=7402315729en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike606515-

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