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Article: Insomnia subtypes and their relationships to daytime sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

TitleInsomnia subtypes and their relationships to daytime sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea
Authors
KeywordsDaytime sleepiness
Hyperarousal
Insomnia
Obstructive sleep apnea
Sleep disorders
Sleep-disordered breathing
Issue Date2005
PublisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/RES
Citation
Respiration, 2005, v. 72 n. 5, p. 460-465 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are the two most common sleep disorders. Studies showed that insomnia complaints were prevalent in OSA. Relatively little is known about the causes of insomnia in OSA and whether etiological factors differ for insomnia subtypes. We hypothesized that sleep onset problem was mainly due to hyperarousal and sleep maintenance difficulty was primarily related to sleep-disordered breathing. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of insomnia subtypes in OSA, compare subjects with sleep onset insomnia, sleep maintenance insomnia and no insomnia symptom, and study the relationship of insomnia subtypes to daytime sleepiness. Methods: We analyzed intake questionnaires and polysomnography and Multiple Sleep Latency Test results of 157 OSA patients. Results: Forty-two percent of the sample had at least one problematic insomnia symptom. The prevalence of sleep onset insomnia, sleep maintenance insomnia and insomnia with early awakening was 6, 26 and 19%, respectively. Patients with sleep onset insomnia had significantly lower apnea-hypopnea (AHI) and arousal indices. There were significant inverse relationships between sleep onset insomnia and measures of daytime sleepiness. On the contrary, subjects with repeated wakening had more severe subjective sleepiness. Results were similar in patients with AHI ≥5 or ≥15. Conclusions: Insomnia symptoms were common in OSA patients. Insomnia subtypes related differently to measures of daytime sleepiness. Our findings suggest that OSA patients with sleep onset insomnia may be in a state of hyperarousal. It is clinically relevant to examine insomnia subtypes, which may influence the treatment decision in sleep-disordered breathing. Copyright © 2005 S. Karger AG.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81640
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.651
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:20:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:20:13Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRespiration, 2005, v. 72 n. 5, p. 460-465en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0025-7931en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81640-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) are the two most common sleep disorders. Studies showed that insomnia complaints were prevalent in OSA. Relatively little is known about the causes of insomnia in OSA and whether etiological factors differ for insomnia subtypes. We hypothesized that sleep onset problem was mainly due to hyperarousal and sleep maintenance difficulty was primarily related to sleep-disordered breathing. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of insomnia subtypes in OSA, compare subjects with sleep onset insomnia, sleep maintenance insomnia and no insomnia symptom, and study the relationship of insomnia subtypes to daytime sleepiness. Methods: We analyzed intake questionnaires and polysomnography and Multiple Sleep Latency Test results of 157 OSA patients. Results: Forty-two percent of the sample had at least one problematic insomnia symptom. The prevalence of sleep onset insomnia, sleep maintenance insomnia and insomnia with early awakening was 6, 26 and 19%, respectively. Patients with sleep onset insomnia had significantly lower apnea-hypopnea (AHI) and arousal indices. There were significant inverse relationships between sleep onset insomnia and measures of daytime sleepiness. On the contrary, subjects with repeated wakening had more severe subjective sleepiness. Results were similar in patients with AHI ≥5 or ≥15. Conclusions: Insomnia symptoms were common in OSA patients. Insomnia subtypes related differently to measures of daytime sleepiness. Our findings suggest that OSA patients with sleep onset insomnia may be in a state of hyperarousal. It is clinically relevant to examine insomnia subtypes, which may influence the treatment decision in sleep-disordered breathing. Copyright © 2005 S. Karger AG.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherS Karger AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.karger.com/RESen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRespirationen_HK
dc.rightsRespiration. Copyright © S Karger AG.en_HK
dc.subjectDaytime sleepinessen_HK
dc.subjectHyperarousalen_HK
dc.subjectInsomniaen_HK
dc.subjectObstructive sleep apneaen_HK
dc.subjectSleep disordersen_HK
dc.subjectSleep-disordered breathingen_HK
dc.titleInsomnia subtypes and their relationships to daytime sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apneaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0025-7931&volume=72&spage=460&epage=465&date=2005&atitle=Insomnia+Subtypes+and+Their+Relationship+to+Daytime+Sleepiness+in+Patients+with+Obstructive+Sleep+Apneaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000087668en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16210883-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-26444465996en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115317en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-26444465996&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume72en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage460en_HK
dc.identifier.epage465en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000231910800003-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerlanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK

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