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Article: The analysis of 51 genes in DSM-IV combined type attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Association signals in DRD4, DAT1 and 16 other genes
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TitleThe analysis of 51 genes in DSM-IV combined type attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Association signals in DRD4, DAT1 and 16 other genes
 
AuthorsBrookes, K2
Xu, X2
Chen, W2
Zhou, K2
Neale, B2
Lowe, N3
Aneey, R3
Franke, B12
Gill, M3
Ebstein, R10
Buitelaar, J12
Sham, P2
Campbell, D2
Knight, J2
Andreou, P2
Altink, M12
Arnold, R4
Boer, F5
Buschgens, C12
Butler, L3
Christiansen, H13
Feldman, L1
Fleischman, K2
Fliers, E12
HoweForbes, R2
Goldfarb, A1
Heise, A9
Gabriëls, I6
KornLubetzki, I15
Marco, R11
Medad, S1
Minderaa, R8
Mulas, F11
Müller, U16
Mulligan, A3
Rabin, K1
Rommelse, N14
Sethna, V2
Sorohan, J3
Uebel, H9
Psychogiou, L7
Weeks, A7
Barrett, R7
Craig, I2
Banaschewski, T9
SonugaBarke, E7
Eisenberg, J1
Kuntsi, J2
Manor, I1
McGuffin, P2
Miranda, A11
Oades, RD13
Plomin, R2
Roeyers, H6
Rothenberger, A9
Sergeant, J14
Steinhausen, HC16
Taylor, E2
Thompson, M7
Faraone, SV17
Asherson, P2
Johansson, L2
 
KeywordsADHD
Association study
Candidate gene
Dopamine
Linkage disequilibrium
Noradrenaline
Serotonin
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/mp
 
CitationMolecular Psychiatry, 2006, v. 11 n. 10, p. 934-953 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4001869
 
AbstractAttention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder, starting in early childhood and persisting into adulthood in the majority of cases. Family and twin studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic factors and candidate gene association studies have identified several loci that exert small but significant effects on ADHD. To provide further clarification of reported associations and identify novel associated genes, we examined 1038 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 51 candidate genes involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter pathways, particularly dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin pathways, in addition to circadian rhythm genes. Analysis used within family tests of association in a sample of 776 DSM-IV ADHD combined type cases ascertained for the International Multi-centre ADHD Gene project. We found nominal significance with one or more SNPs in 18 genes, including the two most replicated findings in the literature: DRD4 and DAT1. Gene-wide tests, adjusted for the number of SNPs analysed in each gene, identified associations with TPH2, ARRB2, SYP, DAT1, ADRB2, HES1, MAOA and PNMT. Further studies will be needed to confirm or refute the observed associations and their generalisability to other samples. © 2006 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
 
ISSN1359-4184
2013 Impact Factor: 15.147
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4001869
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000241302100007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorBrookes, K
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, X
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, W
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, K
 
dc.contributor.authorNeale, B
 
dc.contributor.authorLowe, N
 
dc.contributor.authorAneey, R
 
dc.contributor.authorFranke, B
 
dc.contributor.authorGill, M
 
dc.contributor.authorEbstein, R
 
dc.contributor.authorBuitelaar, J
 
dc.contributor.authorSham, P
 
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, D
 
dc.contributor.authorKnight, J
 
dc.contributor.authorAndreou, P
 
dc.contributor.authorAltink, M
 
dc.contributor.authorArnold, R
 
dc.contributor.authorBoer, F
 
dc.contributor.authorBuschgens, C
 
dc.contributor.authorButler, L
 
dc.contributor.authorChristiansen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorFeldman, L
 
dc.contributor.authorFleischman, K
 
dc.contributor.authorFliers, E
 
dc.contributor.authorHoweForbes, R
 
dc.contributor.authorGoldfarb, A
 
dc.contributor.authorHeise, A
 
dc.contributor.authorGabriëls, I
 
dc.contributor.authorKornLubetzki, I
 
dc.contributor.authorMarco, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMedad, S
 
dc.contributor.authorMinderaa, R
 
dc.contributor.authorMulas, F
 
dc.contributor.authorMüller, U
 
dc.contributor.authorMulligan, A
 
dc.contributor.authorRabin, K
 
dc.contributor.authorRommelse, N
 
dc.contributor.authorSethna, V
 
dc.contributor.authorSorohan, J
 
dc.contributor.authorUebel, H
 
dc.contributor.authorPsychogiou, L
 
dc.contributor.authorWeeks, A
 
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, R
 
dc.contributor.authorCraig, I
 
dc.contributor.authorBanaschewski, T
 
dc.contributor.authorSonugaBarke, E
 
dc.contributor.authorEisenberg, J
 
dc.contributor.authorKuntsi, J
 
dc.contributor.authorManor, I
 
dc.contributor.authorMcGuffin, P
 
dc.contributor.authorMiranda, A
 
dc.contributor.authorOades, RD
 
dc.contributor.authorPlomin, R
 
dc.contributor.authorRoeyers, H
 
dc.contributor.authorRothenberger, A
 
dc.contributor.authorSergeant, J
 
dc.contributor.authorSteinhausen, HC
 
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, E
 
dc.contributor.authorThompson, M
 
dc.contributor.authorFaraone, SV
 
dc.contributor.authorAsherson, P
 
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, L
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:20:05Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:20:05Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractAttention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder, starting in early childhood and persisting into adulthood in the majority of cases. Family and twin studies have demonstrated the importance of genetic factors and candidate gene association studies have identified several loci that exert small but significant effects on ADHD. To provide further clarification of reported associations and identify novel associated genes, we examined 1038 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 51 candidate genes involved in the regulation of neurotransmitter pathways, particularly dopamine, norepinephrine and serotonin pathways, in addition to circadian rhythm genes. Analysis used within family tests of association in a sample of 776 DSM-IV ADHD combined type cases ascertained for the International Multi-centre ADHD Gene project. We found nominal significance with one or more SNPs in 18 genes, including the two most replicated findings in the literature: DRD4 and DAT1. Gene-wide tests, adjusted for the number of SNPs analysed in each gene, identified associations with TPH2, ARRB2, SYP, DAT1, ADRB2, HES1, MAOA and PNMT. Further studies will be needed to confirm or refute the observed associations and their generalisability to other samples. © 2006 Nature Publishing Group All rights reserved.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationMolecular Psychiatry, 2006, v. 11 n. 10, p. 934-953 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4001869
 
dc.identifier.citeulike791323
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.mp.4001869
 
dc.identifier.epage953
 
dc.identifier.hkuros133422
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000241302100007
 
dc.identifier.issn1359-4184
2013 Impact Factor: 15.147
 
dc.identifier.issue10
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16894395
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748646825
 
dc.identifier.spage934
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81628
 
dc.identifier.volume11
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/mp
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Psychiatry
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subjectADHD
 
dc.subjectAssociation study
 
dc.subjectCandidate gene
 
dc.subjectDopamine
 
dc.subjectLinkage disequilibrium
 
dc.subjectNoradrenaline
 
dc.subjectSerotonin
 
dc.titleThe analysis of 51 genes in DSM-IV combined type attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: Association signals in DRD4, DAT1 and 16 other genes
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Geha Mental Health Center
  2. King's College London
  3. Trinity College Dublin
  4. Triversum
  5. Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam
  6. Universiteit Gent
  7. University of Southampton
  8. Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen
  9. Universität Göttingen
  10. Herzog Hospital Jerusalem
  11. Universitat de Valencia
  12. Radboud University
  13. Universitäts Klinikum Essen und Medizinische Fakultät
  14. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam
  15. Shaare Zedek Medical Center
  16. Universität Zürich
  17. State University of New York Upstate Medical University