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Article: Psychosocial correlates of emotional responses to menarche among Chinese adolescent girls

TitlePsychosocial correlates of emotional responses to menarche among Chinese adolescent girls
Authors
KeywordsChina
Femininity
Menarche
Puberty adjustment
Issue Date2003
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jadohea
Citation
Journal Of Adolescent Health, 2003, v. 33 n. 3, p. 193-201 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To determine the psychosocial correlates of emotional responses to menarche among Chinese adolescent girls. Method: A large sample of 1573 post-menarcheal Chinese junior high school students in Hong Kong completed questionnaires on knowledge and preparation of menarche, attitudes toward menstruation, gender-role attitudes, body image, self-esteem, and emotional responses to the onset of the first menstruation. Pearson correlation and hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to determine associations among variables. Results: Participants' mean age at menarche was 11.67 years. Their emotional reactions to menarche were largely negative, with almost 85% reporting feeling annoyed and embarrassed. In spite of these negative feelings, about two-thirds of the participants also reported feeling grown up and another 40% felt as if becoming more feminine. Results of the hierarchical regression analyses showed that negative emotional responses to menarche were correlated with perceptions of menstruation as a negative event, inadequate preparation for menarche, endorsement of indigenous negative menstrual attitudes, and poor self-esteem (24.5% variance explained). Positive emotional responses to menarche were correlated with perceptions of menstruation as a natural event, rejection of indigenous negative menstrual attitudes, positive body image, and adequate preparation for menarche (13.4% variance explained). Conclusions: This study illustrates the need to attend to various psychosocial and cultural factors in the understanding of Chinese adolescent girls' responses to their first menstruation. In particular, general and indigenous menstrual attitudes, which may have been internalized by Chinese adolescent girls at an early age, are found to be the most salient correlates of their emotional responses to menarche. © Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2003.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81574
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.838
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.910
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSoKum Tang, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuenLan Yeung, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, AMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:19:26Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:19:26Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Adolescent Health, 2003, v. 33 n. 3, p. 193-201en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1054-139Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81574-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine the psychosocial correlates of emotional responses to menarche among Chinese adolescent girls. Method: A large sample of 1573 post-menarcheal Chinese junior high school students in Hong Kong completed questionnaires on knowledge and preparation of menarche, attitudes toward menstruation, gender-role attitudes, body image, self-esteem, and emotional responses to the onset of the first menstruation. Pearson correlation and hierarchical regression analyses were conducted to determine associations among variables. Results: Participants' mean age at menarche was 11.67 years. Their emotional reactions to menarche were largely negative, with almost 85% reporting feeling annoyed and embarrassed. In spite of these negative feelings, about two-thirds of the participants also reported feeling grown up and another 40% felt as if becoming more feminine. Results of the hierarchical regression analyses showed that negative emotional responses to menarche were correlated with perceptions of menstruation as a negative event, inadequate preparation for menarche, endorsement of indigenous negative menstrual attitudes, and poor self-esteem (24.5% variance explained). Positive emotional responses to menarche were correlated with perceptions of menstruation as a natural event, rejection of indigenous negative menstrual attitudes, positive body image, and adequate preparation for menarche (13.4% variance explained). Conclusions: This study illustrates the need to attend to various psychosocial and cultural factors in the understanding of Chinese adolescent girls' responses to their first menstruation. In particular, general and indigenous menstrual attitudes, which may have been internalized by Chinese adolescent girls at an early age, are found to be the most salient correlates of their emotional responses to menarche. © Society for Adolescent Medicine, 2003.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jadoheaen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Adolescent Healthen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Adolescent Health. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectFemininityen_HK
dc.subjectMenarcheen_HK
dc.subjectPuberty adjustmenten_HK
dc.titlePsychosocial correlates of emotional responses to menarche among Chinese adolescent girlsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1054-139X&volume=33&issue=3&spage=193&epage=201&date=2003&atitle=Psychosocial+correlates+of+emotional+responses+to+menarche+among+Chinese+adolescent+girlsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLee, AM: amlee@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLee, AM=rp00483en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1054-139X(03)00049-1en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12944010-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0041734615en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros88438en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0041734615&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume33en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage193en_HK
dc.identifier.epage201en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000184908700012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSoKum Tang, C=6602413313en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuenLan Yeung, D=6504797860en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, AM=7405629831en_HK

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