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Article: Depression in college: depressive symptoms and personality factors in Beijing and Hong Kong college freshmen

TitleDepression in college: depressive symptoms and personality factors in Beijing and Hong Kong college freshmen
Authors
Issue Date2008
PublisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comppsych
Citation
Comprehensive Psychiatry, 2008, v. 49 n. 5, p. 496-502 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The present study investigated the 2-week prevalence of depressive symptoms in college freshmen from Beijing and Hong Kong. The relationship between depression and 3 personality factors in these college freshmen was analyzed. Method: Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Neuroticism, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale were administered to 988 Beijing and 802 Hong Kong Chinese college freshmen. Results: Approximately 24.8% of freshmen in Beijing had scores on the CES-D exceeding 16, whereas 8.9% reported scores of 25 or higher. There was no sex difference in prevalence in Beijing. Approximately 43.9% of freshmen in Hong Kong had scores on the CES-D exceeding 16, whereas 17.6% reported scores of 25 or higher. The prevalence is significantly different between sexes in Hong Kong, with approximately 36.1% of men having scores of 16 or higher and 13.4% having scores of 25 or higher and approximately 50.7% of women having scores of 16 or higher and 21.3% having scores of 25 or higher. High neuroticism, concern over mistakes, doubts about actions, low self-esteem, and poor organization were associated with current depressive symptoms in both sites. Conclusion: The higher prevalence of current depressive symptoms in college freshmen in Hong Kong suggests that their mental health is not as satisfactory as that of their counterparts in Beijing. The strong relationship between certain personality features and current depressive symptoms is similar in both regions. Personality differences in the 2 sites explain only part, but not all, of the difference in depressive symptoms between the 2 sites. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81524
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.043
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.100
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSong, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwan, JohnnySHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSham, PCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, SWen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:18:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:18:49Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationComprehensive Psychiatry, 2008, v. 49 n. 5, p. 496-502en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0010-440Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81524-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The present study investigated the 2-week prevalence of depressive symptoms in college freshmen from Beijing and Hong Kong. The relationship between depression and 3 personality factors in these college freshmen was analyzed. Method: Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Neuroticism, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, and Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale were administered to 988 Beijing and 802 Hong Kong Chinese college freshmen. Results: Approximately 24.8% of freshmen in Beijing had scores on the CES-D exceeding 16, whereas 8.9% reported scores of 25 or higher. There was no sex difference in prevalence in Beijing. Approximately 43.9% of freshmen in Hong Kong had scores on the CES-D exceeding 16, whereas 17.6% reported scores of 25 or higher. The prevalence is significantly different between sexes in Hong Kong, with approximately 36.1% of men having scores of 16 or higher and 13.4% having scores of 25 or higher and approximately 50.7% of women having scores of 16 or higher and 21.3% having scores of 25 or higher. High neuroticism, concern over mistakes, doubts about actions, low self-esteem, and poor organization were associated with current depressive symptoms in both sites. Conclusion: The higher prevalence of current depressive symptoms in college freshmen in Hong Kong suggests that their mental health is not as satisfactory as that of their counterparts in Beijing. The strong relationship between certain personality features and current depressive symptoms is similar in both regions. Personality differences in the 2 sites explain only part, but not all, of the difference in depressive symptoms between the 2 sites. © 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWB Saunders Co. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/comppsychen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofComprehensive Psychiatryen_HK
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in <Journal title>. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in PUBLICATION, [VOL#, ISSUE#, (DATE)] DOI#-
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshChina - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshDepression - epidemiology - psychology-
dc.subject.meshStudents - psychology-
dc.subject.meshUniversities-
dc.titleDepression in college: depressive symptoms and personality factors in Beijing and Hong Kong college freshmenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0010-440X&volume=49&issue=5&spage=496&epage=502&date=2008&atitle=Depression+in+college:+depressive+symptoms+and+personality+factors+in+Beijing+and+Hong+Kong+college+freshmenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSham, PC: pcsham@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySham, PC=rp00459en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.comppsych.2008.02.005en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid18702936-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-48849086042en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros152293en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-48849086042&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume49en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage496en_HK
dc.identifier.epage502en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258683200009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSong, Y=15830670600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, Y=22953692700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, D=23992774200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwan, JohnnySH=37063349600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, F=8949970600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSham, PC=34573429300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, SW=23968420300en_HK

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