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Article: Subjective sleep disturbance and its correlates in middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women

TitleSubjective sleep disturbance and its correlates in middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women
Authors
KeywordsChinese women
Menopause
Sleep disorders
Issue Date2006
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/maturitas
Citation
Maturitas, 2006, v. 53 n. 4, p. 396-404 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To examine the factors associated with subjective sleep disturbance in middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women. Methods: A total of 305 women aged 45-55 years were recruited at community-based women's clubs. Eligible subjects were of Chinese ethnicity and not taking oral contraceptives, hormone therapy or had received surgical removal of ovary. Standardized questionnaires, including sociodemographic, health and life-style variables, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) and Perceived Stress Scale were administered. Results: About 18% of the sample complained of difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep or early morning awakening at least three times per week in the past month. About 26% of the women were poor sleepers as defined by a global PSQI score >5. Sleep difficulty was one of the five most commonly reported climacteric symptoms. Cross-sectional analysis found that significantly more peri- and postmenopausal women had subjective sleep disturbance than premenopausal women. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that women who had high levels of somatic complaints, psychological symptoms and perceived stress had a four to sixfold increased risk of reporting disturbed sleep. Menopausal status was not an independent predictor. Conclusions: Comparison of our findings with recent literatures suggested a lower prevalence of insomnia in Hong Kong Chinese middle-aged females than Caucasian women. Somatic complaints, psychological symptoms and perceived stress were independent risk factors for sleep disturbance. Clinicians should screen for sleep problems in middle-aged Chinese women with prominent somatic and psychological symptoms and perceived stress. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81499
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.12
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.107
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChung, KFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTang, MKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:18:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:18:30Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMaturitas, 2006, v. 53 n. 4, p. 396-404en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0378-5122en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/81499-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To examine the factors associated with subjective sleep disturbance in middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese women. Methods: A total of 305 women aged 45-55 years were recruited at community-based women's clubs. Eligible subjects were of Chinese ethnicity and not taking oral contraceptives, hormone therapy or had received surgical removal of ovary. Standardized questionnaires, including sociodemographic, health and life-style variables, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Greene Climacteric Scale (GCS) and Perceived Stress Scale were administered. Results: About 18% of the sample complained of difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep or early morning awakening at least three times per week in the past month. About 26% of the women were poor sleepers as defined by a global PSQI score >5. Sleep difficulty was one of the five most commonly reported climacteric symptoms. Cross-sectional analysis found that significantly more peri- and postmenopausal women had subjective sleep disturbance than premenopausal women. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that women who had high levels of somatic complaints, psychological symptoms and perceived stress had a four to sixfold increased risk of reporting disturbed sleep. Menopausal status was not an independent predictor. Conclusions: Comparison of our findings with recent literatures suggested a lower prevalence of insomnia in Hong Kong Chinese middle-aged females than Caucasian women. Somatic complaints, psychological symptoms and perceived stress were independent risk factors for sleep disturbance. Clinicians should screen for sleep problems in middle-aged Chinese women with prominent somatic and psychological symptoms and perceived stress. © 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/maturitasen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMaturitasen_HK
dc.rightsMaturitas. Copyright © Elsevier Ireland Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectChinese womenen_HK
dc.subjectMenopauseen_HK
dc.subjectSleep disordersen_HK
dc.titleSubjective sleep disturbance and its correlates in middle-aged Hong Kong Chinese womenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0378-5122&volume=53&spage=396&epage=404&date=2005&atitle=Subjective+sleep+disturbance+and+its+correlates+in+middle-aged+Hong+Kong+Chinese+womenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChung, KF: kfchung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChung, KF=rp00377en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.maturitas.2005.07.001en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16107305-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644624799en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros115324en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644624799&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume53en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage396en_HK
dc.identifier.epage404en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236528200004-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChung, KF=7404086681en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, MK=36832159600en_HK

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