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Article: Early child health in Lahore, Pakistan: VII. Diarrhoea

TitleEarly child health in Lahore, Pakistan: VII. Diarrhoea
Authors
Keywordsacute diarrhoea
infants
Pakistan
persistent diarrhoea
Issue Date1993
Citation
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, Supplement, 1993, v. 82 n. 390, p. 79-85 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study was carried out to obtain reliable prospective data on the incidence, home management and duration of infantile diarrhoeal disease in a developing and rapidly urbanizing community. Fourteen hundred and seventy six infants from 4 different communities of Lahore, representing different stages of urbanization, were followed prospectively from birth to 2 years of age. Each child had an average of 3.6 episodes of diarrhoea during one year; 4.3 episodes per child per year in the village, 4.4 in the periurban slum, 3.4 in the urban slum and 1.4 in the upper middle (Um) class control group. The maximum incidence of diarrhoeal episodes occurred in children between 9-10 months of age. No sex difference was found. The seasonal variation showed a peak incidence during April-June. Bloody diarrhoea, in 3-5% of the episodes, was predominantly seen in winter months and in older infants. The maximum use of ORS was seen in the Um class (53%). Antibiotics were used in 75% of all diarrhoeal episodes maximally in the Um class, and morphine derivatives in 1% of all cases. The overall incidence of persistent diarrhoea was 14% of all acute cases, being highest in the village (18%), followed by the periurban slum (14%), Um class (10%) and urban slum (8%) with peak incidence occurring in June and July. Our results confirm the magnitude of the problem of diarrhoea. The proper selection of cohorts, the closely controlled prospective and simultaneous follow-up study of these large samples representing different urbanization stages and socio-economic conditions and the new detailed data on the duration of diarrhoeal episodes makes these results of wider international interest in addition to its importance for health planning in Pakistan.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80127
ISSN
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMahmud, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJalil, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLindblad, BSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:02:43Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:02:43Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, Supplement, 1993, v. 82 n. 390, p. 79-85en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0803-5326en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80127-
dc.description.abstractThis study was carried out to obtain reliable prospective data on the incidence, home management and duration of infantile diarrhoeal disease in a developing and rapidly urbanizing community. Fourteen hundred and seventy six infants from 4 different communities of Lahore, representing different stages of urbanization, were followed prospectively from birth to 2 years of age. Each child had an average of 3.6 episodes of diarrhoea during one year; 4.3 episodes per child per year in the village, 4.4 in the periurban slum, 3.4 in the urban slum and 1.4 in the upper middle (Um) class control group. The maximum incidence of diarrhoeal episodes occurred in children between 9-10 months of age. No sex difference was found. The seasonal variation showed a peak incidence during April-June. Bloody diarrhoea, in 3-5% of the episodes, was predominantly seen in winter months and in older infants. The maximum use of ORS was seen in the Um class (53%). Antibiotics were used in 75% of all diarrhoeal episodes maximally in the Um class, and morphine derivatives in 1% of all cases. The overall incidence of persistent diarrhoea was 14% of all acute cases, being highest in the village (18%), followed by the periurban slum (14%), Um class (10%) and urban slum (8%) with peak incidence occurring in June and July. Our results confirm the magnitude of the problem of diarrhoea. The proper selection of cohorts, the closely controlled prospective and simultaneous follow-up study of these large samples representing different urbanization stages and socio-economic conditions and the new detailed data on the duration of diarrhoeal episodes makes these results of wider international interest in addition to its importance for health planning in Pakistan.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Supplementen_HK
dc.subjectacute diarrhoeaen_HK
dc.subjectinfantsen_HK
dc.subjectPakistanen_HK
dc.subjectpersistent diarrhoeaen_HK
dc.titleEarly child health in Lahore, Pakistan: VII. Diarrhoeaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid8219469-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027173003en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros30228en_HK
dc.identifier.volume82en_HK
dc.identifier.issue390en_HK
dc.identifier.spage79en_HK
dc.identifier.epage85en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993MB05200008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMahmud, A=6603699749en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJalil, F=7004018034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLindblad, BS=7101686934en_HK

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