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Article: Differential damage and recovery of human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents

TitleDifferential damage and recovery of human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to chemotherapeutic agents
Authors
KeywordsApoptosis
Bone marrow microenvironment
Chemotherapy
Mesenchymal stem cell
Proliferation
Issue Date2004
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJH
Citation
British Journal Of Haematology, 2004, v. 127 n. 3, p. 326-334 How to Cite?
AbstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an important cellular component of the bone marrow microenvironment for supporting haemopoiesis. However, their response to high-dose chemotherapy remains unknown. We assessed the acute direct effects of individual chemotherapeutic agents on human MSCs (hMSCs). Using an in vitro culture system, the chemosensitivity of hMSCs was determined by XTT (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H- tetrazolium hydroxide) assay in comparison with that of NB-4 cells, a leukaemic cell line, and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The recovery of cell numbers following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of hMSCs were evaluated. Human MSCs were resistant to chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) (i.e. busulphan, cyclophosphamide and methotrexate). However, they were relatively sensitive to a panel of cytotoxic agents, such as paclitaxel, vincristine, etoposide and cytarabine. Furthermore, different recovery patterns were noted. There was sustained suppression in hMSCs following 3 d exposure to paclitaxel, cytarabine and etoposide. In contrast, significant recovery was seen in hMSCs treated with dexamethasone and vincristine respectively. Human MSCs have different patterns of response to a panel of chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in BMT or cancer therapy. Understanding this variation is important in optimizing conditioning regimens for BMT.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80111
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.401
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.313
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLaw, HKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYu, LLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCFen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:02:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:02:32Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal Of Haematology, 2004, v. 127 n. 3, p. 326-334en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0007-1048en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80111-
dc.description.abstractMesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an important cellular component of the bone marrow microenvironment for supporting haemopoiesis. However, their response to high-dose chemotherapy remains unknown. We assessed the acute direct effects of individual chemotherapeutic agents on human MSCs (hMSCs). Using an in vitro culture system, the chemosensitivity of hMSCs was determined by XTT (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulphophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H- tetrazolium hydroxide) assay in comparison with that of NB-4 cells, a leukaemic cell line, and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The recovery of cell numbers following exposure to chemotherapeutic agents and chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of hMSCs were evaluated. Human MSCs were resistant to chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) (i.e. busulphan, cyclophosphamide and methotrexate). However, they were relatively sensitive to a panel of cytotoxic agents, such as paclitaxel, vincristine, etoposide and cytarabine. Furthermore, different recovery patterns were noted. There was sustained suppression in hMSCs following 3 d exposure to paclitaxel, cytarabine and etoposide. In contrast, significant recovery was seen in hMSCs treated with dexamethasone and vincristine respectively. Human MSCs have different patterns of response to a panel of chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in BMT or cancer therapy. Understanding this variation is important in optimizing conditioning regimens for BMT.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/BJHen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Haematologyen_HK
dc.rightsBritish Journal of Haematology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_HK
dc.subjectApoptosisen_HK
dc.subjectBone marrow microenvironmenten_HK
dc.subjectChemotherapyen_HK
dc.subjectMesenchymal stem cellen_HK
dc.subjectProliferationen_HK
dc.titleDifferential damage and recovery of human mesenchymal stem cells after exposure to chemotherapeutic agentsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0007-1048&volume=127&spage=326&epage=334&date=2004&atitle=Differential+damage+and+recovery+of+human+mesenchymal+stem+cells+after+exposure+to+chemotherapeutic+agentsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF:gcfchan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-2141.2004.05200.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15491295-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-7944222582en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros96413en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-7944222582&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume127en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage326en_HK
dc.identifier.epage334en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000224484800011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, J=26650453600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaw, HKW=7101939394en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, LL=8617704200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, GCF=16160154400en_HK

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