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Article: Length and body mass index at birth and target height influences on patterns of postnatal growth in children born small for gestational age.

TitleLength and body mass index at birth and target height influences on patterns of postnatal growth in children born small for gestational age.
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/
Citation
Pediatrics, 1998, v. 102 n. 6, p. E72 How to Cite?
AbstractOBJECTIVE: Previous growth studies on children born small for gestational age (SGA) indicate that birth length, weight, and target height are important predictors for postnatal catch-up growth in SGA. Their influences on different phases of catch-up growth are still not described. The aim of this study was to clarify the influences of target height, length, and nutritional status at birth on different phases of postnatal catch-up growth (infancy, childhood, puberty) in SGA and the long-term consequences. METHODS: Data were obtained from a longitudinal population-based growth study on Swedish children (N = 2815). Primary outcome measurements include heights, the changes in height standard deviation scores (SDS) during various phases of growth and relative risk for adult shortness. RESULTS: The difference in final height in children born SGA was attributable to their difference in target height and the magnitude of catch-up growth during the first 6 months of life, rather than the difference in length or body mass index (BMI) at birth. Length at birth showed negative influence on catch-up growth during infancy (0 to 2 years of age), but no significant influence thereafter. The BMI or weight for length SDS at birth showed no significant influence on catch-up growth during any growth phase. Target height showed positive influence on catch-up growth from the onset of childhood. Neither target height nor length and BMI at birth showed any significant influence on catch-up growth during puberty. The magnitude of catch-up growth during infancy, especially the first 6 months of life, is most critical in decreasing risk at adult shortness. We confirmed that the SGA group had a sevenfold greater risk for adult shortness than the non-SGA group (relative risk = 7.31; 95% confidence interval: 3.96-13.52). However, approximately 40% of children who were below -2 in height SDS at 2 years of age remained short at final height in both SGA and non-SGA groups. The mean height SDS of children born SGA increased by 1.65 from birth to final height, but the length deficit in centimeters at birth (-5.4 cm) persisted into adulthood (-5.9 cm). CONCLUSIONS: BMI at birth is not related to postnatal catch-up growth in infants born SGA, but birth length and target height are important. The genetic influence on catch-up growth appears to start from the onset of childhood. Being born short or becoming short during the first 2 years of life is similar in terms of risk for adult short stature.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80059
ISSN
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:01:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:01:53Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatrics, 1998, v. 102 n. 6, p. E72en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1098-4275en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80059-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Previous growth studies on children born small for gestational age (SGA) indicate that birth length, weight, and target height are important predictors for postnatal catch-up growth in SGA. Their influences on different phases of catch-up growth are still not described. The aim of this study was to clarify the influences of target height, length, and nutritional status at birth on different phases of postnatal catch-up growth (infancy, childhood, puberty) in SGA and the long-term consequences. METHODS: Data were obtained from a longitudinal population-based growth study on Swedish children (N = 2815). Primary outcome measurements include heights, the changes in height standard deviation scores (SDS) during various phases of growth and relative risk for adult shortness. RESULTS: The difference in final height in children born SGA was attributable to their difference in target height and the magnitude of catch-up growth during the first 6 months of life, rather than the difference in length or body mass index (BMI) at birth. Length at birth showed negative influence on catch-up growth during infancy (0 to 2 years of age), but no significant influence thereafter. The BMI or weight for length SDS at birth showed no significant influence on catch-up growth during any growth phase. Target height showed positive influence on catch-up growth from the onset of childhood. Neither target height nor length and BMI at birth showed any significant influence on catch-up growth during puberty. The magnitude of catch-up growth during infancy, especially the first 6 months of life, is most critical in decreasing risk at adult shortness. We confirmed that the SGA group had a sevenfold greater risk for adult shortness than the non-SGA group (relative risk = 7.31; 95% confidence interval: 3.96-13.52). However, approximately 40% of children who were below -2 in height SDS at 2 years of age remained short at final height in both SGA and non-SGA groups. The mean height SDS of children born SGA increased by 1.65 from birth to final height, but the length deficit in centimeters at birth (-5.4 cm) persisted into adulthood (-5.9 cm). CONCLUSIONS: BMI at birth is not related to postnatal catch-up growth in infants born SGA, but birth length and target height are important. The genetic influence on catch-up growth appears to start from the onset of childhood. Being born short or becoming short during the first 2 years of life is similar in terms of risk for adult short stature.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Academy of Pediatrics. The Journal's web site is located at http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatricsen_HK
dc.titleLength and body mass index at birth and target height influences on patterns of postnatal growth in children born small for gestational age.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1120-7507&volume=102&issue=6&spage=1&epage=7&date=1998&atitle=Length+and+Body+Mass+Index+at+Birth+and+Target+Height+Influences+on+Patterns+of+Postnatal+Growth+in+Children+Born+Small+for+Gestational+Ageen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1542/peds.102.6.e72-
dc.identifier.pmid9832600-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032337560en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros38749en_HK
dc.identifier.volume102en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spageE72en_HK
dc.identifier.epageE72en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000077311500030-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, ZC=7401699005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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