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Article: Target height as predicted by parental heights in a population-based study

TitleTarget height as predicted by parental heights in a population-based study
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/
Citation
Pediatric Research, 1998, v. 44 n. 4, p. 563-571 How to Cite?
AbstractThe corrected midparental height method was introduced by Tanner in 1970 (Tanner method) and is commonly used to estimate target height in children to evaluate the effectiveness of growth-promoting therapies. It has not been established if the equation used to compute target height should be the same for children with short, normal, or tall parents. In this study, we examined the predicted target height values by parental heights in a large population- based study (n = 2402). A simple linear function of midparental height (x) was proposed to estimate target height (y): y = 45.99 + 0.78x (boys), y = 37.85+0.75x (girls), with a 95% predicted interval of about ±10 cm. The prediction model was similar for boys and girls in SD scores (SDS), and was not affected by assortative mating or difference in parental heights. The model may underestimate the potential stature by about 2 cm for children with midparental height below -2 SDS, or 163 cm. In comparison, the Tanner method may lead to a 6-cm error in underestimating target height for these children. The function would be a better choice than the Tanner method for estimating target height in the clinical evaluation of growth promotion treatments because it is common that short children also have short parents. Children with very short parents will usually be much taller than their parents in adult stature, and we believe that a different function should be developed. The results support the proposed nondominant, non-sex-linked, polygenic inheritance in stature. The estimated heritability values were 0.75-0.78 in cm or 0.55-0.60 in SDS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80028
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.761
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.290
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:01:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:01:32Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Research, 1998, v. 44 n. 4, p. 563-571en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-3998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80028-
dc.description.abstractThe corrected midparental height method was introduced by Tanner in 1970 (Tanner method) and is commonly used to estimate target height in children to evaluate the effectiveness of growth-promoting therapies. It has not been established if the equation used to compute target height should be the same for children with short, normal, or tall parents. In this study, we examined the predicted target height values by parental heights in a large population- based study (n = 2402). A simple linear function of midparental height (x) was proposed to estimate target height (y): y = 45.99 + 0.78x (boys), y = 37.85+0.75x (girls), with a 95% predicted interval of about ±10 cm. The prediction model was similar for boys and girls in SD scores (SDS), and was not affected by assortative mating or difference in parental heights. The model may underestimate the potential stature by about 2 cm for children with midparental height below -2 SDS, or 163 cm. In comparison, the Tanner method may lead to a 6-cm error in underestimating target height for these children. The function would be a better choice than the Tanner method for estimating target height in the clinical evaluation of growth promotion treatments because it is common that short children also have short parents. Children with very short parents will usually be much taller than their parents in adult stature, and we believe that a different function should be developed. The results support the proposed nondominant, non-sex-linked, polygenic inheritance in stature. The estimated heritability values were 0.75-0.78 in cm or 0.55-0.60 in SDS.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Researchen_HK
dc.rightsPediatric Research. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.titleTarget height as predicted by parental heights in a population-based studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-3998&volume=44&issue=4&spage=563&epage=571&date=1999&atitle=Target+Height+as+Predicted+by+Parental+Heights+in+a+Population-Based+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid9773847-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031697192en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros41776en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031697192&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume44en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage563en_HK
dc.identifier.epage571en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000076148500016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, ZC=7401699005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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