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Article: Correlates of lower leg length growth and weight gain in early life

TitleCorrelates of lower leg length growth and weight gain in early life
Authors
KeywordsChinese
Infancy
Knemometry
Length
Lower leg length
Weight
Issue Date1996
PublisherMedcom Limited.
Citation
Hong Kong Journal of Paediatrics, 1996, v. 1 n. 2, p. 137-140 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim was to examine how well short-term growth in lower leg length (LLL) and total body length are correlated with weight gain in early life in healthy infants. This is an observational study with weekly follow up for 2 to 13 weeks for ages between birth and 21 weeks. The study was done at the Mother's Choice Adoption Center, Hong Kong. Weekly measurement of lower leg length (LLL), total body length and weight were made in 22 healthy full term Hong Kong Chinese infants (12 boys and 10 girls). The sample represents all new infants coming to the adoption center during the reqruitment period, January to May 1994. The technical error of LLL was 0.53 mm, which corresponds to 20% of the weekly growth rate in early life. In comparison, the technical error for length was 2.8 mm, or around 40% of the mean weekly growth rate in length. The main finding was a significant correlation between the gain in LLL and weight for short-term growth in early life in normal healthy babies: over 2, 3 and 4 week intervals the correlation were 0.32, 0.40 and 0.51, respectively. On the other hand the correlation coefficients between the gain in length and in weight were much lower for intervals below 4 weeks. We conclude that LLL and not length can be recommended for short-term growth studies in early life for intervals shorter than 4 weeks; the shortest interval seems to be 2 weeks in normal children, but possibly shorter under catch up growth. For intervals of 4 weeks or longer no recommendation can be made at present. LLL measurements may be useful in nutritional, hormonal and/or metabolic studies in early life by adding reliable information about longitudinal bone growth.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80027
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, LCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, JPEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:01:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:01:31Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal of Paediatrics, 1996, v. 1 n. 2, p. 137-140en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1013-9923en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/80027-
dc.description.abstractThe aim was to examine how well short-term growth in lower leg length (LLL) and total body length are correlated with weight gain in early life in healthy infants. This is an observational study with weekly follow up for 2 to 13 weeks for ages between birth and 21 weeks. The study was done at the Mother's Choice Adoption Center, Hong Kong. Weekly measurement of lower leg length (LLL), total body length and weight were made in 22 healthy full term Hong Kong Chinese infants (12 boys and 10 girls). The sample represents all new infants coming to the adoption center during the reqruitment period, January to May 1994. The technical error of LLL was 0.53 mm, which corresponds to 20% of the weekly growth rate in early life. In comparison, the technical error for length was 2.8 mm, or around 40% of the mean weekly growth rate in length. The main finding was a significant correlation between the gain in LLL and weight for short-term growth in early life in normal healthy babies: over 2, 3 and 4 week intervals the correlation were 0.32, 0.40 and 0.51, respectively. On the other hand the correlation coefficients between the gain in length and in weight were much lower for intervals below 4 weeks. We conclude that LLL and not length can be recommended for short-term growth studies in early life for intervals shorter than 4 weeks; the shortest interval seems to be 2 weeks in normal children, but possibly shorter under catch up growth. For intervals of 4 weeks or longer no recommendation can be made at present. LLL measurements may be useful in nutritional, hormonal and/or metabolic studies in early life by adding reliable information about longitudinal bone growth.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMedcom Limited.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Paediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectInfancy-
dc.subjectKnemometry-
dc.subjectLength-
dc.subjectLower leg length-
dc.subjectWeight-
dc.titleCorrelates of lower leg length growth and weight gain in early lifeen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1013-9923&volume=1&spage=137&epage=140&date=1996&atitle=Correlates+of+lower+leg+length+growth+and+weight+gain+in+early+lifeen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, JPE: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, JPE=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros22122en_HK

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