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Article: Longitudinal growth in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease

TitleLongitudinal growth in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease
Authors
KeywordsAdolescence
Childhood
Crohn's disease
Growth
Inflammatory bowel disease
Ulcerative colitis
Issue Date1994
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jpgn.org
Citation
Journal Of Pediatric Gastroenterology And Nutrition, 1994, v. 18 n. 2, p. 165-173 How to Cite?
AbstractWeight and height were followed longitudinally from birth to adulthood in children with inflammatory bowel disease living in a defined area of Sweden, 1983 through 1987: 124 children out of a possible 128 were studied. During the year preceding diagnosis, height growth velocity was significantly reduced in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. At the time of diagnosis, weight-for-height was subnormal in both children with ulcerative colitis (p < 0.05) and those with Crohn's disease (p < 0.001), while height was reduced only in children with Crohn's disease (p < 0.05). Weight for height was normalized within one year in ulcerative colitis, after the initiation of medical therapy. In Crohn's disease, weight-for-height improved during the years following diagnosis but height remained subnormal. Children with ulcerative colitis reached puberty at the normal time and their final heights became normal. In children with Crohn's disease, puberty was delayed (p < 0.001) and final height was reduced (p < 0.01). The impact of inflammatory bowel disease on growth was substantial, but it was smaller in this study than in many other published studies. The possible reasons for this difference include use of population-based material and a relatively short interval between the first symptoms and the start of treatment. Our findings indicate that, although final height was significantly reduced in children with Crohn's disease, delayed puberty reduced the negative effects on permanent adult height, to a certain extent compensating for the period of poor growth earlier in life.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79971
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.4
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.227
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHildebrand, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKristiansson, Ben_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:00:53Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pediatric Gastroenterology And Nutrition, 1994, v. 18 n. 2, p. 165-173en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0277-2116en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79971-
dc.description.abstractWeight and height were followed longitudinally from birth to adulthood in children with inflammatory bowel disease living in a defined area of Sweden, 1983 through 1987: 124 children out of a possible 128 were studied. During the year preceding diagnosis, height growth velocity was significantly reduced in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. At the time of diagnosis, weight-for-height was subnormal in both children with ulcerative colitis (p < 0.05) and those with Crohn's disease (p < 0.001), while height was reduced only in children with Crohn's disease (p < 0.05). Weight for height was normalized within one year in ulcerative colitis, after the initiation of medical therapy. In Crohn's disease, weight-for-height improved during the years following diagnosis but height remained subnormal. Children with ulcerative colitis reached puberty at the normal time and their final heights became normal. In children with Crohn's disease, puberty was delayed (p < 0.001) and final height was reduced (p < 0.01). The impact of inflammatory bowel disease on growth was substantial, but it was smaller in this study than in many other published studies. The possible reasons for this difference include use of population-based material and a relatively short interval between the first symptoms and the start of treatment. Our findings indicate that, although final height was significantly reduced in children with Crohn's disease, delayed puberty reduced the negative effects on permanent adult height, to a certain extent compensating for the period of poor growth earlier in life.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jpgn.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutritionen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.subjectAdolescenceen_HK
dc.subjectChildhooden_HK
dc.subjectCrohn's diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectGrowthen_HK
dc.subjectInflammatory bowel diseaseen_HK
dc.subjectUlcerative colitisen_HK
dc.titleLongitudinal growth in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel diseaseen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0277-2116&volume=13&spage=167&epage=173&date=1994&atitle=Longitudinal+growth+in+children+and+adolescents+with+inflammatory+bowel+diseaseen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid8014763-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028125709en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros30277en_HK
dc.identifier.volume18en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage165en_HK
dc.identifier.epage173en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994MV01800008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHildebrand, H=7101666160en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKristiansson, B=7005482988en_HK

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