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Article: Fetal size to final height in Hong Kong Chinese children

TitleFetal size to final height in Hong Kong Chinese children
Authors
KeywordsEthnic contrast
Fetal growth
Growth determination
Height
Longitudinal follow-up
Issue Date2000
PublisherFreund Publishing House, Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.freundpublishing.com/Journal_Pediatric_Endocrinology_Metabolism/JPEMprev.htm
Citation
Journal Of Pediatric Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2000, v. 13 n. 3, p. 269-279 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: It has been known that size at birth is important for postnatal growth and final height. However, there are few data in the literature on the difference in height growth patterns from fetal size to final height between less privileged and more privileged populations. The aim of this study was to describe the important features in height growth from birth to maturity in an underprivileged Hong Kong Chinese cohort in comparison to a more privileged Swedish cohort. Methods: The longitudinal height growth data from birth to maturity in full-term healthy Hong Kong Chinese children (n=132) who were born in 1967 were analyzed, and compared with those for Swedish children who were born in 1973-75 (n=3650). Results: Children with longer birth length achieved taller adult stature with respect to their target height. The mean final height retained the same order as that of the mean length at birth for various birth length groups. All children in the Hong Kong Chinese series showed catch-down height growth during the first 2 years of life, in contrast to the catch-up in smaller babies and catch-down in larger babies for the Swedish series. The growth deficit for the Hong Kong Chinese was -0.9 SDS at birth, -1.8 SDS at 2.0 years of age, -2.1 SDS at 8 years of age, and -1.7 SDS at final height. Conclusions: Fetal size is important for postnatal growth and attained final height with respect to a child's familial genetic potential in stature, not only for privileged populations, but also for underprivileged populations. However, children in underprivileged populations experience a persistent increasing growth deficit during infancy and childhood. Special attention should be given to monitor their growth status in early years and to institute appropriate intervention programs.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79958
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.912
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.493
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:00:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:00:45Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Pediatric Endocrinology And Metabolism, 2000, v. 13 n. 3, p. 269-279en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0334-018Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79958-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: It has been known that size at birth is important for postnatal growth and final height. However, there are few data in the literature on the difference in height growth patterns from fetal size to final height between less privileged and more privileged populations. The aim of this study was to describe the important features in height growth from birth to maturity in an underprivileged Hong Kong Chinese cohort in comparison to a more privileged Swedish cohort. Methods: The longitudinal height growth data from birth to maturity in full-term healthy Hong Kong Chinese children (n=132) who were born in 1967 were analyzed, and compared with those for Swedish children who were born in 1973-75 (n=3650). Results: Children with longer birth length achieved taller adult stature with respect to their target height. The mean final height retained the same order as that of the mean length at birth for various birth length groups. All children in the Hong Kong Chinese series showed catch-down height growth during the first 2 years of life, in contrast to the catch-up in smaller babies and catch-down in larger babies for the Swedish series. The growth deficit for the Hong Kong Chinese was -0.9 SDS at birth, -1.8 SDS at 2.0 years of age, -2.1 SDS at 8 years of age, and -1.7 SDS at final height. Conclusions: Fetal size is important for postnatal growth and attained final height with respect to a child's familial genetic potential in stature, not only for privileged populations, but also for underprivileged populations. However, children in underprivileged populations experience a persistent increasing growth deficit during infancy and childhood. Special attention should be given to monitor their growth status in early years and to institute appropriate intervention programs.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherFreund Publishing House, Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.freundpublishing.com/Journal_Pediatric_Endocrinology_Metabolism/JPEMprev.htmen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolismen_HK
dc.subjectEthnic contrasten_HK
dc.subjectFetal growthen_HK
dc.subjectGrowth determinationen_HK
dc.subjectHeighten_HK
dc.subjectLongitudinal follow-upen_HK
dc.titleFetal size to final height in Hong Kong Chinese childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0334-018X&volume=13&issue=3&spage=269&epage=279&date=2000&atitle=Fetal+Size+to+Final+Height+in+Hong+Kong+Chinese+Childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10714752-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034024935en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros48457en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034024935&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage269en_HK
dc.identifier.epage279en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000085701800006-
dc.publisher.placeIsraelen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuo, ZC=7401699005en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, LCK=7007049461en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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