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Article: Is teenage obesity associated with depression and low self-esteem?: A pilot study

TitleIs teenage obesity associated with depression and low self-esteem?: A pilot study
Authors
KeywordsAdolescent
Depression
Obesity
Self-esteem
Issue Date2008
PublisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.asp
Citation
Hong Kong Journal Of Paediatrics, 2008, v. 13 n. 1, p. 30-38+66 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: A pilot study to explore the impact of perceived and actual overweight on self-esteem and depression in Hong Kong teenagers. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study on 152 Chinese adolescents aged 12-16 was conducted in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Overweight was defined as a body mass index (BMI) above 90 percentile of age-adjusted BMI reference. The short form Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13) and the Chinese version of Piers-Harris 2 Self-Concept Scale were used to measure depression and self-esteem respectively. Results: Our results showed that perceived overweight but not actual overweight female subjects had statistically significantly lower Piers-Harris score and higher depression score. Kruskal-Wallis test showed that depression was significantly more common in female teenagers who perceived themselves as being overweight but who were not actually overweight compared to those with normal BMI and body image. On the contrary, male teenagers who perceived themselves as thin were more at risk for lower Piers-Harris subscale scores. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that perceived body image has more detrimental impact on depression and self-esteem than actual body mass index in both male and female Hong Kong teenagers. This may reflect a probable influence from the mass media, advertisement, or prevailing societal values in over-promoting a slim body-image which may result in self-depreciating tendencies if female teenagers perceived themselves as being overweight. Health care professionals need to pay attention to body image perception rather than focusing solely on the physical build of teenagers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79952
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.194
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, PWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T08:00:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T08:00:40Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHong Kong Journal Of Paediatrics, 2008, v. 13 n. 1, p. 30-38+66en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1013-9923en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79952-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: A pilot study to explore the impact of perceived and actual overweight on self-esteem and depression in Hong Kong teenagers. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study on 152 Chinese adolescents aged 12-16 was conducted in a secondary school in Hong Kong. Overweight was defined as a body mass index (BMI) above 90 percentile of age-adjusted BMI reference. The short form Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13) and the Chinese version of Piers-Harris 2 Self-Concept Scale were used to measure depression and self-esteem respectively. Results: Our results showed that perceived overweight but not actual overweight female subjects had statistically significantly lower Piers-Harris score and higher depression score. Kruskal-Wallis test showed that depression was significantly more common in female teenagers who perceived themselves as being overweight but who were not actually overweight compared to those with normal BMI and body image. On the contrary, male teenagers who perceived themselves as thin were more at risk for lower Piers-Harris subscale scores. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that perceived body image has more detrimental impact on depression and self-esteem than actual body mass index in both male and female Hong Kong teenagers. This may reflect a probable influence from the mass media, advertisement, or prevailing societal values in over-promoting a slim body-image which may result in self-depreciating tendencies if female teenagers perceived themselves as being overweight. Health care professionals need to pay attention to body image perception rather than focusing solely on the physical build of teenagers.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherMedcom Limited. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.hkjpaed.org/index.aspen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHong Kong Journal of Paediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectAdolescenten_HK
dc.subjectDepressionen_HK
dc.subjectObesityen_HK
dc.subjectSelf-esteemen_HK
dc.titleIs teenage obesity associated with depression and low self-esteem?: A pilot studyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1013-9923&volume=13&spage=30&epage=38&date=2008&atitle=Is+Teenage+Obesity+Associated+with+Depression+and+Low+Self-Esteem?:+A+Pilot+Studyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38949085896en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros140551en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-38949085896&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume13en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage30en_HK
dc.identifier.epage38+66en_HK
dc.publisher.placeHong Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, PWK=23489415500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WHS=13310222200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, PWH=7406120357en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, LCK=7007049461en_HK

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