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Article: Early child health in Lahore, Pakistan: IV. Child care practices

TitleEarly child health in Lahore, Pakistan: IV. Child care practices
Authors
Keywordschild care practices
developing country
hygiene measures
infants
Issue Date1993
Citation
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, Supplement, 1993, v. 82 n. 390, p. 39-46 How to Cite?
AbstractChild care practices and hygiene measures were studied at 6 months of age in a longitudinally followed cohort of 1476 infants born between September 1984 to March 1987 in four socio-economically different areas in and around Lahore, Pakistan. Although, 76-98% of the mothers looked after their infants during health and 96-98% during a diarrhoeal illness, child care practices and hygiene measures differed significantly between the four areas. During a diarrhoeal episode, the mothers from the upper middle class took timely medical help, fed ample food and Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) to the sick infants and provided uncontaminated food to them in clean surroundings. The mothers from the village and the periurban slum took their sick child, mostly after the second day of illness, to a doctor, but preferred home remedies. Fourteen percent of the mothers in the village and 6% in the periurban slum did not seek any medical help at all. One-third of the families, from these two areas, fed food to children 12 hours after cooking; the surroundings of the child were dirty with large numbers of flies present throughout the year, though the food was commonly kept covered with a lid. We constructed a simple measure of the surroundings of the child, rated as dirty, medium or clean; it was found to be associated to both parental illiteracy and child growth, but not with housing standard. The main conclusion is that any attempt to improve child-care practices and the hygienic environment for the child, should focus on maternal literacy and simple health messages.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79896
ISSN
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZaman, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorJalil, Fen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:58Z-
dc.date.issued1993en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, Supplement, 1993, v. 82 n. 390, p. 39-46en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0803-5326en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79896-
dc.description.abstractChild care practices and hygiene measures were studied at 6 months of age in a longitudinally followed cohort of 1476 infants born between September 1984 to March 1987 in four socio-economically different areas in and around Lahore, Pakistan. Although, 76-98% of the mothers looked after their infants during health and 96-98% during a diarrhoeal illness, child care practices and hygiene measures differed significantly between the four areas. During a diarrhoeal episode, the mothers from the upper middle class took timely medical help, fed ample food and Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) to the sick infants and provided uncontaminated food to them in clean surroundings. The mothers from the village and the periurban slum took their sick child, mostly after the second day of illness, to a doctor, but preferred home remedies. Fourteen percent of the mothers in the village and 6% in the periurban slum did not seek any medical help at all. One-third of the families, from these two areas, fed food to children 12 hours after cooking; the surroundings of the child were dirty with large numbers of flies present throughout the year, though the food was commonly kept covered with a lid. We constructed a simple measure of the surroundings of the child, rated as dirty, medium or clean; it was found to be associated to both parental illiteracy and child growth, but not with housing standard. The main conclusion is that any attempt to improve child-care practices and the hygienic environment for the child, should focus on maternal literacy and simple health messages.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatrics, Supplementen_HK
dc.subjectchild care practicesen_HK
dc.subjectdeveloping countryen_HK
dc.subjecthygiene measuresen_HK
dc.subjectinfantsen_HK
dc.titleEarly child health in Lahore, Pakistan: IV. Child care practicesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid8219466-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027314275en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros30225en_HK
dc.identifier.volume82en_HK
dc.identifier.issue390en_HK
dc.identifier.spage39en_HK
dc.identifier.epage46en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1993MB05200005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZaman, S=7006571869en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJalil, F=7004018034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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