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Article: Long-term consequences of early linear growth retardation (stunting) in Swedish children

TitleLong-term consequences of early linear growth retardation (stunting) in Swedish children
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/
Citation
Pediatric Research, 2000, v. 47 n. 4 I, p. 475-480 How to Cite?
AbstractLinear growth retardation (stunting) is prevalent (10-80%) in developing countries. It takes place between 6 and 18 mo of age and can be characterized by the delayed onset of the childhood phase of growth. The objective of this work was to study the existence of stunting in early life and, when present, its lifelong effects on final height in a normal healthy population in a developed country. A total of 2432 children with longitudinal height data from birth to adulthood were analyzed. The series represents a normal healthy population-based sample of full-term children born around 1974 in Goteborg, Sweden. We found the incidence of stunting to be about 10% as indicated by delayed onset of the childhood phase of growth (> 12 mo of age): 14% in boys and 8% in girls. In a multiple linear regression model, final height was described by length at 6 mo of age, age at onset of the childhood phase of growth, and age at peak height velocity during puberty. All three measures contributed significantly (p < 0.05) to final height with a total R2 of 0.33. A final height difference of 5.0 cm could be explained by abnormal onset of the childhood phase of growth in this normal population. The timing of the childhood onset of growth did not correlate with the timing of puberty. For the first time, we can conclude that stunting in early life is not only a problem in developing countries. Its importance on final height achieved is clearly shown, even after controlling for the timing of puberty.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79892
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.761
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.290
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:55Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Research, 2000, v. 47 n. 4 I, p. 475-480en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-3998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79892-
dc.description.abstractLinear growth retardation (stunting) is prevalent (10-80%) in developing countries. It takes place between 6 and 18 mo of age and can be characterized by the delayed onset of the childhood phase of growth. The objective of this work was to study the existence of stunting in early life and, when present, its lifelong effects on final height in a normal healthy population in a developed country. A total of 2432 children with longitudinal height data from birth to adulthood were analyzed. The series represents a normal healthy population-based sample of full-term children born around 1974 in Goteborg, Sweden. We found the incidence of stunting to be about 10% as indicated by delayed onset of the childhood phase of growth (> 12 mo of age): 14% in boys and 8% in girls. In a multiple linear regression model, final height was described by length at 6 mo of age, age at onset of the childhood phase of growth, and age at peak height velocity during puberty. All three measures contributed significantly (p < 0.05) to final height with a total R2 of 0.33. A final height difference of 5.0 cm could be explained by abnormal onset of the childhood phase of growth in this normal population. The timing of the childhood onset of growth did not correlate with the timing of puberty. For the first time, we can conclude that stunting in early life is not only a problem in developing countries. Its importance on final height achieved is clearly shown, even after controlling for the timing of puberty.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Researchen_HK
dc.rightsPediatric Research. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.titleLong-term consequences of early linear growth retardation (stunting) in Swedish childrenen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-3998&volume=47&issue=4&spage=475&epage=480&date=2000&atitle=Long-Term+Consequences+of+Early+Linear+Growth+Retardation+(Stunting)+in+Swedish+Childrenen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10759154-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034028883en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros48509en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034028883&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume47en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4 Ien_HK
dc.identifier.spage475en_HK
dc.identifier.epage480en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000086151000011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, Y=14068710900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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