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Article: Fetal growth, early postnatal growth and motor development in Pakistani infants

TitleFetal growth, early postnatal growth and motor development in Pakistani infants
Authors
KeywordsBody height
Growth
Motor development
Thinness
Issue Date2001
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
International Journal Of Epidemiology, 2001, v. 30 n. 1, p. 66-72 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. Studies have often compared the postnatal motor development of 'small' versus 'normal' newborns. Not much is known about the associations between a broad spectrum of size at birth and motor development. The effect of early postnatal growth on motor development is little researched. Growth failure in terms of shortness and thinness should be differentiated, but not many studies have the data for this analysis. Methods. This is a longitudinal study of infants born in Lahore, Pakistan, between 1984 and 1987. Age at commencement of independent walking and age at 'building a 3-cube tower' were taken as indicators of gross and fine motor development, respectively. Size at birth was captured by length and thinness as continuous variables; postnatal growth from birth to 6 months of age was measured by changes in length and thinness. Adjustment for covariates and handling of censored cases were performed by generalized log gamma regression. Results. Thinness at birth and postnatal stunting and wasting had a linear, inverse association with gross motor development (each P<0.05). Birth length had a non-linear, inverse association with this outcome (P<0.05). Birth length, thinness at birth and postnatal wasting had a linear, inverse association with fine motor development (each P<0.05). Conclusion. Both fetal and early postnatal growth over a broad spectrum may affect infants' motor development. It is not just the babies who were very small at birth that suffered. Birth length appeared to be more influential than other anthropometric indicators.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79871
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 7.522
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.381
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, JPEen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:41Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:41Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Epidemiology, 2001, v. 30 n. 1, p. 66-72en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0300-5771en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79871-
dc.description.abstractBackground. Studies have often compared the postnatal motor development of 'small' versus 'normal' newborns. Not much is known about the associations between a broad spectrum of size at birth and motor development. The effect of early postnatal growth on motor development is little researched. Growth failure in terms of shortness and thinness should be differentiated, but not many studies have the data for this analysis. Methods. This is a longitudinal study of infants born in Lahore, Pakistan, between 1984 and 1987. Age at commencement of independent walking and age at 'building a 3-cube tower' were taken as indicators of gross and fine motor development, respectively. Size at birth was captured by length and thinness as continuous variables; postnatal growth from birth to 6 months of age was measured by changes in length and thinness. Adjustment for covariates and handling of censored cases were performed by generalized log gamma regression. Results. Thinness at birth and postnatal stunting and wasting had a linear, inverse association with gross motor development (each P<0.05). Birth length had a non-linear, inverse association with this outcome (P<0.05). Birth length, thinness at birth and postnatal wasting had a linear, inverse association with fine motor development (each P<0.05). Conclusion. Both fetal and early postnatal growth over a broad spectrum may affect infants' motor development. It is not just the babies who were very small at birth that suffered. Birth length appeared to be more influential than other anthropometric indicators.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Epidemiologyen_HK
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Epidemiology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectBody heighten_HK
dc.subjectGrowthen_HK
dc.subjectMotor developmenten_HK
dc.subjectThinnessen_HK
dc.titleFetal growth, early postnatal growth and motor development in Pakistani infantsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0300-5771&volume=30&spage=66&epage=74&date=2001&atitle=Fetal+growth,+early+postnatal+growth+and+motor+development+in+Pakistani+infantsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, JPE: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, JPE=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11171859-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035093886en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros56535en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035093886&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume30en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage66en_HK
dc.identifier.epage72en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167587300020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YB=7202111441en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, PSF=7102503720en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, JPE=7005218406en_HK

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