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Article: Foetal size to final height

TitleFoetal size to final height
Authors
Issue Date2000
Citation
Acta Paediatrica, 2000, v. 89 n. 6, p. 632-636 How to Cite?
AbstractIt is well known that some adult diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, may be programmed during foetal life. It is not clear, however, whether final height may be predicted from foetal growth. A longitudinal cohort of full-term healthy Swedish babies (n = 3650) was followed up from birth to maturity in a population-based growth study. Length or height and its changes were analysed from birth to 18 y of age; 2807 children, with data available on birth length, final height and parental height, were included in this analysis. The result clearly shows that length at birth relates to final height. In terms of standard deviation scores (SDS), the mean difference in length at birth from the mean was greatly decreased in final height, but retained the same order as was seen at birth. In terms of centimeter difference from the reference mean values, the difference in length at birth remained roughly stable into final height. For instance, babies 5 cm above or below the mean birth length will end up approximately 5 cm above or below the mean in final height. Parental height–a surrogate value of the genetic final height potential of an individual–is shown to influence postnatal growth in height strongly. However, the difference from the mean in length at birth remained into adulthood within the same midparental height group. Conclusion: This study reveals that trends in foetal linear growth continue into maturity. Foetal growth is a significant predictor of postnatal growth. Final height is dependent on both the magnitude of foetal growth and the genetic potential in stature, and appears to some extent to be programmed from foetal growth.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79861
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuo, ZCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:34Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatrica, 2000, v. 89 n. 6, p. 632-636en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79861-
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that some adult diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, may be programmed during foetal life. It is not clear, however, whether final height may be predicted from foetal growth. A longitudinal cohort of full-term healthy Swedish babies (n = 3650) was followed up from birth to maturity in a population-based growth study. Length or height and its changes were analysed from birth to 18 y of age; 2807 children, with data available on birth length, final height and parental height, were included in this analysis. The result clearly shows that length at birth relates to final height. In terms of standard deviation scores (SDS), the mean difference in length at birth from the mean was greatly decreased in final height, but retained the same order as was seen at birth. In terms of centimeter difference from the reference mean values, the difference in length at birth remained roughly stable into final height. For instance, babies 5 cm above or below the mean birth length will end up approximately 5 cm above or below the mean in final height. Parental height–a surrogate value of the genetic final height potential of an individual–is shown to influence postnatal growth in height strongly. However, the difference from the mean in length at birth remained into adulthood within the same midparental height group. Conclusion: This study reveals that trends in foetal linear growth continue into maturity. Foetal growth is a significant predictor of postnatal growth. Final height is dependent on both the magnitude of foetal growth and the genetic potential in stature, and appears to some extent to be programmed from foetal growth.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Paediatricaen_HK
dc.subject.meshBody Height - genetics-
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Index-
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic and Fetal Development-
dc.subject.meshGrowth-
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn-
dc.titleFoetal size to final heighten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, JPE=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1651-2227.2000.tb00355.x-
dc.identifier.pmid10914953-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033869373-
dc.identifier.hkuros49665en_HK
dc.identifier.volume89-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage632-
dc.identifier.epage636-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088027800003-

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