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Article: Prevalence of peripheral neuropathy with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

TitlePrevalence of peripheral neuropathy with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pedneu
Citation
Pediatric Neurology, 1999, v. 20 n. 3, p. 204-209 How to Cite?
AbstractInsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is rare in Chinese children. There have been no reports on the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in Chinese children with IDDM. This study aimed to determine prevalence of subclinical peripheral neuropathy in Chinese children with IDDM. Motor and sensory nerve conduction studies of both median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial (motor nerves) and median, ulnar, and sural (sensory nerves) were performed in 38 children with IDDM (18 males, 20 females). The age was 4-21 years (mean = 12.7 years; median = 12 years, 6 months). The duration of diabetes was less than 5 years in 15, 5-10 years in 14, and more than 10 years in nine. Neurophysiologic evidence of subclinical peripheral neuropathy was present in 26 patients (68.4%) of which motor, sensory, or motor and sensory involvement was 26 (68.4%), eight (21.1%), and 26 (68.4%), respectively. Twelve (31.6%) and 14 (36.8%) children had mild and moderate degrees of peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Among the 26 children with abnormal nerve- conduction studies, two (7.7%) had symptoms of numbness and pain in the lower limbs. Thus, two children had symptomatic neuropathy and most (n = 24) had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy. Two children had systemic hypertension, and one (3.8%) had laboratory evidence of early renal complications. Analysis of demographic and laboratory risk factors for the development of subclinical peripheral neuropathy revealed that the age of onset, duration of diabetes, level of hemoglobin Ale, triglyceride, cholesterol, serum creatinine, and urea, microalbumin/creatinine ratio, and urinary microalbumin excretion rate were significantly related to the development of subclinical peripheral neuropathy in specific nerves.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79831
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.866
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.819
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBao, XHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Ven_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:14Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:14Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Neurology, 1999, v. 20 n. 3, p. 204-209en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0887-8994en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79831-
dc.description.abstractInsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is rare in Chinese children. There have been no reports on the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in Chinese children with IDDM. This study aimed to determine prevalence of subclinical peripheral neuropathy in Chinese children with IDDM. Motor and sensory nerve conduction studies of both median, ulnar, peroneal, and tibial (motor nerves) and median, ulnar, and sural (sensory nerves) were performed in 38 children with IDDM (18 males, 20 females). The age was 4-21 years (mean = 12.7 years; median = 12 years, 6 months). The duration of diabetes was less than 5 years in 15, 5-10 years in 14, and more than 10 years in nine. Neurophysiologic evidence of subclinical peripheral neuropathy was present in 26 patients (68.4%) of which motor, sensory, or motor and sensory involvement was 26 (68.4%), eight (21.1%), and 26 (68.4%), respectively. Twelve (31.6%) and 14 (36.8%) children had mild and moderate degrees of peripheral neuropathy, respectively. Among the 26 children with abnormal nerve- conduction studies, two (7.7%) had symptoms of numbness and pain in the lower limbs. Thus, two children had symptomatic neuropathy and most (n = 24) had asymptomatic peripheral neuropathy. Two children had systemic hypertension, and one (3.8%) had laboratory evidence of early renal complications. Analysis of demographic and laboratory risk factors for the development of subclinical peripheral neuropathy revealed that the age of onset, duration of diabetes, level of hemoglobin Ale, triglyceride, cholesterol, serum creatinine, and urea, microalbumin/creatinine ratio, and urinary microalbumin excretion rate were significantly related to the development of subclinical peripheral neuropathy in specific nerves.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pedneuen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Neurologyen_HK
dc.rightsPediatric Neurology. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.titlePrevalence of peripheral neuropathy with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0887-8994&volume=20&issue=3&spage=204&epage=209&date=1999&atitle=Prevalence+of+Peripheral+Neuropathy+With+Insulin-Dependent+Diabetes+Mellitusen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, V: vcnwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, V=rp00334en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0887-8994(98)00141-6en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid10207929-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0032922588en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros40380en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0032922588&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue3en_HK
dc.identifier.spage204en_HK
dc.identifier.epage209en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000079598400006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBao, XH=7202850187en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, V=7202525632en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, Q=7408165904en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, LCK=7007049461en_HK

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