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Conference Paper: Born small for gestational age: Consequences for growth

TitleBorn small for gestational age: Consequences for growth
Authors
Keywordscatch-up growth
final height
growth faltering
height
small for gestational age
Issue Date1996
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1651-2227/issues
Citation
The 21st International Symposium on Growth Hormone and Growth Factors in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Venice, Italy, 19-20 April 1996. In Acta Paediatrica. Supplement, 1996, v. 85 n. 417, p. 8-13 How to Cite?
AbstractA large number of studies have documented a strong correlation between size at birth and subsequent height, although the reported incidence of catch-up growth and consequently the impact on final height has varied with time and between countries. These variations may be real, but could also be related to a number of methodological problems. The aim of this study was to explore two important aspects related to postnatal growth after disturbed fetal growth: first, the definition of small for gestational age (SGA), including the selection of cut-off points in defining shortness; and, secondly, the importance of the general socio-economic status of the population with regard to the incidence of growth faltering in early life. Data were analysed from two longitudinal population-based studies, one from Sweden and one from Hong Kong. Of the Swedish cohort, 3.8% had a birth length below -2 SD scores; in the Hong Kong population the corresponding value was 11.9% (Swedish reference values were used in both studies). The following conclusions were made. Size at birth is important for postnatal growth, and the difference in length at birth of 9-10 cm between the two extreme birth length subgroups remains, on average, until maturity. This seems to be true for the two study populations with different degrees of socio-economic development. However, the rate of catch-up growth is highly dependent on the definition of SGA, on the rate of catch-up growth in early life and on the incidence of growth faltering between 6 and 18 months of age.
DescriptionReview article
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79823
ISSN
2014 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.123
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorBaber, FMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, LCKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYeung, CYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:09Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationThe 21st International Symposium on Growth Hormone and Growth Factors in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Venice, Italy, 19-20 April 1996. In Acta Paediatrica. Supplement, 1996, v. 85 n. 417, p. 8-13en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0803-5326en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79823-
dc.descriptionReview article-
dc.description.abstractA large number of studies have documented a strong correlation between size at birth and subsequent height, although the reported incidence of catch-up growth and consequently the impact on final height has varied with time and between countries. These variations may be real, but could also be related to a number of methodological problems. The aim of this study was to explore two important aspects related to postnatal growth after disturbed fetal growth: first, the definition of small for gestational age (SGA), including the selection of cut-off points in defining shortness; and, secondly, the importance of the general socio-economic status of the population with regard to the incidence of growth faltering in early life. Data were analysed from two longitudinal population-based studies, one from Sweden and one from Hong Kong. Of the Swedish cohort, 3.8% had a birth length below -2 SD scores; in the Hong Kong population the corresponding value was 11.9% (Swedish reference values were used in both studies). The following conclusions were made. Size at birth is important for postnatal growth, and the difference in length at birth of 9-10 cm between the two extreme birth length subgroups remains, on average, until maturity. This seems to be true for the two study populations with different degrees of socio-economic development. However, the rate of catch-up growth is highly dependent on the definition of SGA, on the rate of catch-up growth in early life and on the incidence of growth faltering between 6 and 18 months of age.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1651-2227/issuesen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Paediatrica. Supplementen_HK
dc.subjectcatch-up growthen_HK
dc.subjectfinal heighten_HK
dc.subjectgrowth falteringen_HK
dc.subjectheighten_HK
dc.subjectsmall for gestational ageen_HK
dc.titleBorn small for gestational age: Consequences for growthen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0803-5326&volume=417&spage=8&epage=13&date=1996&atitle=Born+small+for+gestational+age:+consequences+for+growthen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, LCK: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, LCK=rp00337en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1651-2227.1996.tb14284.x-
dc.identifier.pmid9055902-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030484973en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros21540en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030484973&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume85en_HK
dc.identifier.issue417en_HK
dc.identifier.spage8en_HK
dc.identifier.epage13en_HK
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.description.otherThe 21st International Symposium on Growth Hormone and Growth Factors in Endocrinology and Metabolism, Venice, Italy, 19-20 April 1996. In Acta Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, Supplement, 1996, v. 85 n. 417, p. 8-13-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaber, FM=6506995578en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, LCK=7007049461en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, CY=7201354144en_HK

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