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Article: Balancing infection control practices and family-centred care in a cohort of paediatric suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome patients in Hong Kong

TitleBalancing infection control practices and family-centred care in a cohort of paediatric suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome patients in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsFamily-centred paediatric nursing
Nursing care
SARS
Issue Date2006
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JPC
Citation
Journal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 2006, v. 42 n. 1-2, p. 20-27 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To identify key nursing issues for paediatric patients suspected of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in relation to the family-centred model of nursing care and to develop a data-based model of paediatric nursing care to be better applied in situations of suspected SARS or where outbreaks of other infectious diseases occur. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive case series, which analysed the medical and nursing records of all highly-suspected/suspected SARS patients admitted to a major acute hospital in Hong Kong. Key nursing personnel were also interviewed. Results: The study included a total of 17 highly-suspected and 49 suspected SARS paediatric patients (age: 1-16). None of the paediatric patients was eventually diagnosed of SARS. Most cases presented fever (highly-suspected: 76.5%/ suspected: 100%), cough (64.7%/71.4%), nausea and vomiting (35.3%/28.6%). Nursing care was provided to the patients as necessary. Both the children and parents experienced fear of SARS, as well as separation anxiety arisen from hospitalization in a strict isolation setting. Conclusions: Infection control overshadowed the family-centred nursing practices in the management of SARS paediatric patients. A major nursing care issue for SARS paediatric patients was to achieve a careful balance between attending to patients' physical and psychological needs and adhering to the infection control guidelines, while at the same time offering psychological support to family members. The current philosophy and practice of family-centred nursing model neglect the special needs of children with infectious diseases and predominantly apply to children with non-infectious diseases that family visits are allowed and nursing care by parents are encouraged. © Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79821
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.477
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.692
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SSCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, DYKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, EMYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTiwari, AFYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, DCNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:08Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Paediatrics And Child Health, 2006, v. 42 n. 1-2, p. 20-27en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1034-4810en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79821-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To identify key nursing issues for paediatric patients suspected of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in relation to the family-centred model of nursing care and to develop a data-based model of paediatric nursing care to be better applied in situations of suspected SARS or where outbreaks of other infectious diseases occur. Methods: This is a retrospective descriptive case series, which analysed the medical and nursing records of all highly-suspected/suspected SARS patients admitted to a major acute hospital in Hong Kong. Key nursing personnel were also interviewed. Results: The study included a total of 17 highly-suspected and 49 suspected SARS paediatric patients (age: 1-16). None of the paediatric patients was eventually diagnosed of SARS. Most cases presented fever (highly-suspected: 76.5%/ suspected: 100%), cough (64.7%/71.4%), nausea and vomiting (35.3%/28.6%). Nursing care was provided to the patients as necessary. Both the children and parents experienced fear of SARS, as well as separation anxiety arisen from hospitalization in a strict isolation setting. Conclusions: Infection control overshadowed the family-centred nursing practices in the management of SARS paediatric patients. A major nursing care issue for SARS paediatric patients was to achieve a careful balance between attending to patients' physical and psychological needs and adhering to the infection control guidelines, while at the same time offering psychological support to family members. The current philosophy and practice of family-centred nursing model neglect the special needs of children with infectious diseases and predominantly apply to children with non-infectious diseases that family visits are allowed and nursing care by parents are encouraged. © Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Asia. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JPCen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Paediatrics and Child Healthen_HK
dc.subjectFamily-centred paediatric nursingen_HK
dc.subjectNursing careen_HK
dc.subjectSARSen_HK
dc.titleBalancing infection control practices and family-centred care in a cohort of paediatric suspected severe acute respiratory syndrome patients in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1034-4810&volume=42 &issue=1-2&spage=20&epage=27&date=2006&atitle=Balancing+infection+control+practices+and+family-centred+care+in+a+cohort+of+paediatric+suspected+severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome+patients+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, SSC: scsophia@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTiwari, AFY: tiwari@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SSC=rp00423en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTiwari, AFY=rp00441en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1440-1754.2006.00776.xen_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16487385en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645299556en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros113894en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33645299556&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume42en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage20en_HK
dc.identifier.epage27en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235357300007-
dc.publisher.placeAustraliaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, SSC=7404255378en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, DYK=36785210700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, EMY=12796061900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTiwari, AFY=7101772273en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, DCN=24391473100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, SL=8576781700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK

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