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Article: Seasonality of growth in Shanghai infants (n = 4128) born in 11 consecutive years

TitleSeasonality of growth in Shanghai infants (n = 4128) born in 11 consecutive years
Authors
KeywordsGrowth
Infant
Longitudinal study
Seasonality
Issue Date2001
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcn
Citation
European Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2001, v. 55 n. 8, p. 714-725 How to Cite?
AbstractObjective: To describe the seasonal growth patterns in Shanghai infants, to explore seasonal time lag between weight gain and length gain, and to investigate the long-term effect of birth season on early postnatal growth. Design: Community-based longitudinal study. Setting: Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Method: Children were followed up monthly from 1 to 6 months, 3 monthly from 6 to 12 months, and 6 monthly from 12 to 24 months. Subjects: A total of 6018 children born between 1 January 1980 and 31 December 1990. Main outcome measures: Weight gain, length gain and change in body mass index (BMI) over the seasons of the year. Results: The infants tended to grow faster in height in spring and summer, and faster in weight and BMI in autumn and winter. The seasonal effect on weight gain and length gain is largely independent. The mean length value at 1 month of age was about 2.0 cm higher in infants born in May to July than in those born in November to February. At 24 months of age this difference was reduced to about 0.7 cm. Conclusions: There is a clear and consistent seasonality in growth in Shanghai infants. The seasonality seems to act independently on weight and length. Birth month has some association with attained size, but this is reduced during the first 2 y of life.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79812
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.935
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWang, WPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuo, ZPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:59:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:59:02Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal Of Clinical Nutrition, 2001, v. 55 n. 8, p. 714-725en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0954-3007en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79812-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe the seasonal growth patterns in Shanghai infants, to explore seasonal time lag between weight gain and length gain, and to investigate the long-term effect of birth season on early postnatal growth. Design: Community-based longitudinal study. Setting: Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Method: Children were followed up monthly from 1 to 6 months, 3 monthly from 6 to 12 months, and 6 monthly from 12 to 24 months. Subjects: A total of 6018 children born between 1 January 1980 and 31 December 1990. Main outcome measures: Weight gain, length gain and change in body mass index (BMI) over the seasons of the year. Results: The infants tended to grow faster in height in spring and summer, and faster in weight and BMI in autumn and winter. The seasonal effect on weight gain and length gain is largely independent. The mean length value at 1 month of age was about 2.0 cm higher in infants born in May to July than in those born in November to February. At 24 months of age this difference was reduced to about 0.7 cm. Conclusions: There is a clear and consistent seasonality in growth in Shanghai infants. The seasonality seems to act independently on weight and length. Birth month has some association with attained size, but this is reduced during the first 2 y of life.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ejcnen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Clinical Nutritionen_HK
dc.subjectGrowthen_HK
dc.subjectInfanten_HK
dc.subjectLongitudinal studyen_HK
dc.subjectSeasonalityen_HK
dc.titleSeasonality of growth in Shanghai infants (n = 4128) born in 11 consecutive yearsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0954-3007&volume=55&spage=714&epage=725&date=2001&atitle=Seasonality+of+growth+in+Shanghai+infants+(n+=+4128)+born+in+11+consecutive+yearsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601212en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11477471-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034889307en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros64929en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034889307&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume55en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage714en_HK
dc.identifier.epage725en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000170365600012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, X=7405298825en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, WP=7501765704en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuo, ZP=7404657655en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YB=7202111441en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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