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Article: Fetal growth and early postnatal growth are related to blood pressure in adults

TitleFetal growth and early postnatal growth are related to blood pressure in adults
Authors
KeywordsBlood pressure
Body height
Growth and development
Hong Kong
Postnatal growth
Thinness
Issue Date2000
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://hyper.ahajournals.org/
Citation
Hypertension, 2000, v. 36 n. 5, p. 795-800 How to Cite?
AbstractIt is commonly agreed that birth weight is associated with blood pressure in adults. However, not much is known about birth length, ponderal index, and early postnatal growth, whose effects on adult blood pressure, if any, can affect the interpretation of the birth weight-blood pressure association. This study examined the association between fetal growth, early postnatal growth, and blood pressure in Chinese adults. One hundred twenty-two subjects born in Hong Kong in 1967 were followed from birth to age 30 years. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze the association between size at birth, postnatal changes in body size, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at age 30 years. Having adjusted for potential confounders and each other explanatory variable, it is found that birth length standard deviation score (regression coefficient or β= -3.2), ponderal index at birth (β= -1.8), and postnatal changes in ponderal index from age 6 months to 18 months (β= -2.2) were inversely associated with systolic blood pressure (each P < 0.05). Postnatal changes in length standard deviation score were not significantly associated with systolic blood pressure. Birth length standard deviation score was inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure at age 30 years (β= -2.6; P < 0.05). Other anthropometric variables were not associated with diastolic blood pressure. The results support the hypotheses that both fetal growth and early postnatal growth may have a long-term impact on blood pressure in adults. It also highlights the importance of differentiating length and weight for length.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79772
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.294
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.702
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YBen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLow, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorOsmond, Cen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBarker, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:58:32Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:58:32Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationHypertension, 2000, v. 36 n. 5, p. 795-800en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0194-911Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79772-
dc.description.abstractIt is commonly agreed that birth weight is associated with blood pressure in adults. However, not much is known about birth length, ponderal index, and early postnatal growth, whose effects on adult blood pressure, if any, can affect the interpretation of the birth weight-blood pressure association. This study examined the association between fetal growth, early postnatal growth, and blood pressure in Chinese adults. One hundred twenty-two subjects born in Hong Kong in 1967 were followed from birth to age 30 years. Multiple linear regression was used to analyze the association between size at birth, postnatal changes in body size, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at age 30 years. Having adjusted for potential confounders and each other explanatory variable, it is found that birth length standard deviation score (regression coefficient or β= -3.2), ponderal index at birth (β= -1.8), and postnatal changes in ponderal index from age 6 months to 18 months (β= -2.2) were inversely associated with systolic blood pressure (each P < 0.05). Postnatal changes in length standard deviation score were not significantly associated with systolic blood pressure. Birth length standard deviation score was inversely associated with diastolic blood pressure at age 30 years (β= -2.6; P < 0.05). Other anthropometric variables were not associated with diastolic blood pressure. The results support the hypotheses that both fetal growth and early postnatal growth may have a long-term impact on blood pressure in adults. It also highlights the importance of differentiating length and weight for length.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://hyper.ahajournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofHypertensionen_HK
dc.subjectBlood pressureen_HK
dc.subjectBody heighten_HK
dc.subjectGrowth and developmenten_HK
dc.subjectHong Kongen_HK
dc.subjectPostnatal growthen_HK
dc.subjectThinnessen_HK
dc.titleFetal growth and early postnatal growth are related to blood pressure in adultsen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0143-117X&volume=36&spage=795&epage=800&date=2000&atitle=Fetal+Growth+and+Early+Postnatal+Growth+Are+Related+to+Blood+Pressure+in+Adultsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLow, L: lcklow@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLow, L=rp00337en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid11082145-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033695095en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros60780en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033695095&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume36en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage795en_HK
dc.identifier.epage800en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000165420500011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, YB=7202111441en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLow, L=7007049461en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridOsmond, C=7103383561en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarker, D=35381325000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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