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Article: Population-based body mass index reference values from Goteborg, Sweden: Birth to 18 years of age

TitlePopulation-based body mass index reference values from Goteborg, Sweden: Birth to 18 years of age
Authors
KeywordsBody mass index reference values
Children
Swedish
Issue Date2000
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1328-8067&site=1
Citation
Acta Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, 2000, v. 89 n. 5, p. 582-592 How to Cite?
AbstractThe body mass index or BMI (weight/height 2) is a somewhat crude estimate of nutritional status. However, due to its simplicity and high correlation with total body fat, it has been the method of choice in both paediatric clinics and research over the years. Since BMI is not an equivalent measure of the percentage of body fat in different ethnic groups and in the two sexes, population-specific BMI reference data is needed. Several BMI reference values have been published for French, American, British and Hong Kong children in recent years. In Sweden, weight-for-age and height-for-age reference values, which were published in 1976, are still used as the current national growth reference values. Updated growth reference values are needed for assessing nutritional status due to the secular trend toward and increasing prevalence Of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to produce BMI reference values for Swedish children of paediatric age. The series came from a large Swedish population-based longitudinal growth study of 3650 full-term babies followed from birth to 18 y of age. The children in this data set were born in the early 1970s. The pattern and level of 50th centile BMI values presented here are quite similar to those of the Swedish cohort study in the 1950s. In comparison with the US BMI reference values, the Swedish values are much lower, especially for the higher centile values. Conclusion: The new Swedish BMI chart from our study may provide a useful tool for paediarricians to assess body fat, and consequently nutritional status, in Swedish children.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79765
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.647
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.794
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:58:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:58:27Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_HK
dc.identifier.citationActa Paediatrica, International Journal Of Paediatrics, 2000, v. 89 n. 5, p. 582-592en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0803-5253en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79765-
dc.description.abstractThe body mass index or BMI (weight/height 2) is a somewhat crude estimate of nutritional status. However, due to its simplicity and high correlation with total body fat, it has been the method of choice in both paediatric clinics and research over the years. Since BMI is not an equivalent measure of the percentage of body fat in different ethnic groups and in the two sexes, population-specific BMI reference data is needed. Several BMI reference values have been published for French, American, British and Hong Kong children in recent years. In Sweden, weight-for-age and height-for-age reference values, which were published in 1976, are still used as the current national growth reference values. Updated growth reference values are needed for assessing nutritional status due to the secular trend toward and increasing prevalence Of childhood obesity. The aim of this study was to produce BMI reference values for Swedish children of paediatric age. The series came from a large Swedish population-based longitudinal growth study of 3650 full-term babies followed from birth to 18 y of age. The children in this data set were born in the early 1970s. The pattern and level of 50th centile BMI values presented here are quite similar to those of the Swedish cohort study in the 1950s. In comparison with the US BMI reference values, the Swedish values are much lower, especially for the higher centile values. Conclusion: The new Swedish BMI chart from our study may provide a useful tool for paediarricians to assess body fat, and consequently nutritional status, in Swedish children.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1328-8067&site=1en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofActa Paediatrica, International Journal of Paediatricsen_HK
dc.subjectBody mass index reference valuesen_HK
dc.subjectChildrenen_HK
dc.subjectSwedishen_HK
dc.titlePopulation-based body mass index reference values from Goteborg, Sweden: Birth to 18 years of ageen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid10852197-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033870576en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros48644en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033870576&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume89en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage582en_HK
dc.identifier.epage592en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000087619800020-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Q=36821495800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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