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Article: Growth in full-term small-for-gestational-age infants: From birth to final height

TitleGrowth in full-term small-for-gestational-age infants: From birth to final height
Authors
Issue Date1995
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/
Citation
Pediatric Research, 1995, v. 38 n. 5, p. 733-739 How to Cite?
AbstractIntrauterine growth retardation, or being small for gestational age (SGA), has a life-long impact on a fetus's potential for development and survival. The incidence and relative risk of short stature in children born SGA were studied using a Swedish healthy full-term (37-43 wk of gestation) singleton birth cohort (n = 3650) from Goteborg, followed from birth to final height at about 18 y of age. Most infants, defined as SGA on the basis of a birth length less than 2 standard deviation scores (SDS) below the mean (SGA, infants), showed catch-up growth during the first 6 mo after birth, and by 1 y only 13.4% of the SGA(L) infants were below 2 SDS in height. This percentage decreased further during childhood to reach a value of 7.9% at 18 y of age. Although most SGA(L) infants have catch-up growth in early life, those who do not constitute 21% of short, prepubertal children. At 18 y of age, 22% of the total short population were short at birth (<- 2 SDS), whereas when birth weight was used to define SGA, only 14% of the 18-y-old short population were light at birth. SGA(E) infants were found to have a 7 fold higher risk for short final stature (relative risk, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 3.7-13.6) in comparison with the non-SGA(L) group. In a multiple linear regression analysis, both birth length and mid-parental height were found to be significantly related to the magnitude of catch-up growth from birth to 18 y of age. Neither the length of gestation nor birth weight showed such a relationship. It is concluded that the vasal majority (>86%) of 'healthy' full-term singleton SGA(L) infants will achieve catch-up in height during the first 6-12 mo of life, and that this is almost independent of whether birth weight or birth length is used to define SGA. Of the remaining, non-catch-up SGA infants, about 50% remain short in final height, and thus constitute a high risk group for persistent short stature.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79755
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.761
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.290
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorAlbertssonWikland, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:58:19Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:58:19Z-
dc.date.issued1995en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Research, 1995, v. 38 n. 5, p. 733-739en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-3998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79755-
dc.description.abstractIntrauterine growth retardation, or being small for gestational age (SGA), has a life-long impact on a fetus's potential for development and survival. The incidence and relative risk of short stature in children born SGA were studied using a Swedish healthy full-term (37-43 wk of gestation) singleton birth cohort (n = 3650) from Goteborg, followed from birth to final height at about 18 y of age. Most infants, defined as SGA on the basis of a birth length less than 2 standard deviation scores (SDS) below the mean (SGA, infants), showed catch-up growth during the first 6 mo after birth, and by 1 y only 13.4% of the SGA(L) infants were below 2 SDS in height. This percentage decreased further during childhood to reach a value of 7.9% at 18 y of age. Although most SGA(L) infants have catch-up growth in early life, those who do not constitute 21% of short, prepubertal children. At 18 y of age, 22% of the total short population were short at birth (<- 2 SDS), whereas when birth weight was used to define SGA, only 14% of the 18-y-old short population were light at birth. SGA(E) infants were found to have a 7 fold higher risk for short final stature (relative risk, 7.1; 95% confidence interval, 3.7-13.6) in comparison with the non-SGA(L) group. In a multiple linear regression analysis, both birth length and mid-parental height were found to be significantly related to the magnitude of catch-up growth from birth to 18 y of age. Neither the length of gestation nor birth weight showed such a relationship. It is concluded that the vasal majority (>86%) of 'healthy' full-term singleton SGA(L) infants will achieve catch-up in height during the first 6-12 mo of life, and that this is almost independent of whether birth weight or birth length is used to define SGA. Of the remaining, non-catch-up SGA infants, about 50% remain short in final height, and thus constitute a high risk group for persistent short stature.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Researchen_HK
dc.rightsPediatric Research. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.titleGrowth in full-term small-for-gestational-age infants: From birth to final heighten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-3998&volume=38&issue=5&spage=733&epage=739&date=1995&atitle=Growth+in+Full-Term+Small-for-Gestational-Age+Infants:+From+Birth+to+Final+Heighten_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid8552442-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0028889404en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros31056en_HK
dc.identifier.volume38en_HK
dc.identifier.issue5en_HK
dc.identifier.spage733en_HK
dc.identifier.epage739en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1995TA40800017-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbertssonWikland, K=19639814800en_HK

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