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Article: BMI in childhood and its association with height gain, timing of puberty, and final height

TitleBMI in childhood and its association with height gain, timing of puberty, and final height
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/
Citation
Pediatric Research, 2001, v. 49 n. 2, p. 244-251 How to Cite?
AbstractNo large population-based study has addressed the question of how overnutrition is related to subsequent height gain in childhood, timing of puberty, and final height. The present data represent a large Swedish population-based longitudinal growth study. Height gain in childhood, timing of reaching peak height velocity and height gain during adolescence, and final height were regarded as the short-term, interim, and long-term outcomes of childhood nutritional status, i.e. body mass index (BMI) change between 2 and 8 y. Midparental height was adjusted as the genetic influence on linear growth of the child. Childhood BMI gain was related to an increased height gain during the same period, i.e. an increase of 1 BMI unit was associated with an increase in height of 0.23 cm in boys and 0.29 cm in girls. A higher BMI gain in childhood was related to an earlier onset of puberty; the impact on the timing of puberty was 0.6 y in boys and 0.7 y in girls. Each increased unit of BMI gain in childhood also reduced the height gain in adolescence, 0.88 cm for boys and 0.51 cm for girls. No direct correlation was shown between childhood BMI gain and final height. We conclude that overnutrition between 2 and 8 y of age will not be beneficial from a final height point of view, as the temporary increase in height gain in childhood will be compensated by an earlier pubertal maturity and a subnormal height gain in adolescence.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79754
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.761
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.290
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, Qen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKarlberg, Jen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:58:18Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:58:18Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPediatric Research, 2001, v. 49 n. 2, p. 244-251en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0031-3998en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79754-
dc.description.abstractNo large population-based study has addressed the question of how overnutrition is related to subsequent height gain in childhood, timing of puberty, and final height. The present data represent a large Swedish population-based longitudinal growth study. Height gain in childhood, timing of reaching peak height velocity and height gain during adolescence, and final height were regarded as the short-term, interim, and long-term outcomes of childhood nutritional status, i.e. body mass index (BMI) change between 2 and 8 y. Midparental height was adjusted as the genetic influence on linear growth of the child. Childhood BMI gain was related to an increased height gain during the same period, i.e. an increase of 1 BMI unit was associated with an increase in height of 0.23 cm in boys and 0.29 cm in girls. A higher BMI gain in childhood was related to an earlier onset of puberty; the impact on the timing of puberty was 0.6 y in boys and 0.7 y in girls. Each increased unit of BMI gain in childhood also reduced the height gain in adolescence, 0.88 cm for boys and 0.51 cm for girls. No direct correlation was shown between childhood BMI gain and final height. We conclude that overnutrition between 2 and 8 y of age will not be beneficial from a final height point of view, as the temporary increase in height gain in childhood will be compensated by an earlier pubertal maturity and a subnormal height gain in adolescence.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pedresearch.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPediatric Researchen_HK
dc.rightsPediatric Research. Copyright © Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.en_HK
dc.titleBMI in childhood and its association with height gain, timing of puberty, and final heighten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0031-3998&volume=49&issue=2&spage=244&epage=251&date=2001&atitle=BMI+in+Childhood+and+Its+Association+with+Height+Gain,+Timing+of+Puberty,+and+Final+Heighten_HK
dc.identifier.emailKarlberg, J: jpekarl@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKarlberg, J=rp00400en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1203/00006450-200102000-00019-
dc.identifier.pmid11158521-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035142934en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros56538en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035142934&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume49en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage244en_HK
dc.identifier.epage251en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000166686000019-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, Q=36821495800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarlberg, J=7005218406en_HK

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