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Article: Mechanical testing of a smart spinal implant locking mechanism based on nickel-titanium alloy

TitleMechanical testing of a smart spinal implant locking mechanism based on nickel-titanium alloy
Authors
KeywordsImplant locking mechanism
Implant stability
Nitinol
Spinal implant
Issue Date2006
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 2006, v. 31 n. 20, p. 2296-2303 How to Cite?
AbstractSTUDY DESIGN. Development and testing of a new spinal implant-locking mechanism based on the special properties of nickel-titanium alloy. OBJECTIVE. To develop a new self-tightening locking mechanism to reduce fretting corrosion at implant junctions. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. All current implant locking involves tightening of a nut against the rod and screw head to form a coupling. Particulate debris is generated, and the coupling becomes loose because of wear between the rod and locking mechanism (fretting). To avoid this fretting, a new locking mechanism with an automatic retightening effect based on the superelastic and shape-memory properties of nickel-titanium alloy has been developed. METHOD. The new coupling made of nickel-titanium alloy will tightly lock the rod when temperature increases to 50°C (shape-memory effect). If fretting occurs, the coupling will further tighten itself around the rod (superelastic effect). This new coupling is mechanically tested against 4 current implant couplings. RESULTS. In axial compression, conventional couplings failed between 570 and 740 N, while the new coupling reached 800 N without loosening. In axial rotation, conventional devices failed between 1.8 and 5.3 Nm, while the new coupling reached 6.5 Nm without failure. During testing, the retightening effect could be seen on the force versus displacement plot. CONCLUSIONS. To our knowledge, the self-tightening coupling is a new concept not previously described and is attributable to the superior superelastic effect of the new coupling. This implant coupling has the potential to be used as a very low profile system and also in nonfusion technologies in which demands on the coupling would not higher without the protection of spinal fusion. ©2006, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79737
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYeung, KWKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, WWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:58:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:58:01Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2006, v. 31 n. 20, p. 2296-2303en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79737-
dc.description.abstractSTUDY DESIGN. Development and testing of a new spinal implant-locking mechanism based on the special properties of nickel-titanium alloy. OBJECTIVE. To develop a new self-tightening locking mechanism to reduce fretting corrosion at implant junctions. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. All current implant locking involves tightening of a nut against the rod and screw head to form a coupling. Particulate debris is generated, and the coupling becomes loose because of wear between the rod and locking mechanism (fretting). To avoid this fretting, a new locking mechanism with an automatic retightening effect based on the superelastic and shape-memory properties of nickel-titanium alloy has been developed. METHOD. The new coupling made of nickel-titanium alloy will tightly lock the rod when temperature increases to 50°C (shape-memory effect). If fretting occurs, the coupling will further tighten itself around the rod (superelastic effect). This new coupling is mechanically tested against 4 current implant couplings. RESULTS. In axial compression, conventional couplings failed between 570 and 740 N, while the new coupling reached 800 N without loosening. In axial rotation, conventional devices failed between 1.8 and 5.3 Nm, while the new coupling reached 6.5 Nm without failure. During testing, the retightening effect could be seen on the force versus displacement plot. CONCLUSIONS. To our knowledge, the self-tightening coupling is a new concept not previously described and is attributable to the superior superelastic effect of the new coupling. This implant coupling has the potential to be used as a very low profile system and also in nonfusion technologies in which demands on the coupling would not higher without the protection of spinal fusion. ©2006, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_HK
dc.rightsThis is a non-final version of an article published in final form in Spine, 2006, v. 31 n. 20, p. 2296-2303-
dc.subjectImplant locking mechanismen_HK
dc.subjectImplant stabilityen_HK
dc.subjectNitinolen_HK
dc.subjectSpinal implanten_HK
dc.subject.meshMaterials Testing - methods-
dc.subject.meshNickel-
dc.subject.meshOrthopedic Fixation Devices-
dc.subject.meshProstheses and Implants-
dc.subject.meshSpinal Fusion - instrumentation - methods-
dc.titleMechanical testing of a smart spinal implant locking mechanism based on nickel-titanium alloyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0887-9869&volume=31&issue=20&spage=2296&epage=2303&date=2006&atitle=Mechanical+testing+of+a+smart+spinal+implant+locking+mechanism+based+on+nickel-titanium+alloyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailYeung, KWK:wkkyeung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLu, WW:wwlu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK:hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC:cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, KWK=rp00309en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLu, WW=rp00411en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.brs.0000238967.82799.3den_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16985456-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748914299en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros145164en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros136591-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748914299&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue20en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2296en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2303en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000240696400007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYeung, KWK=13309584700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, WW=7404215221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK

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