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Article: Changes in melatonin receptors in relation to the development of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens

TitleChanges in melatonin receptors in relation to the development of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens
Authors
KeywordsBinding properties
Chicken
Melatonin receptor
Pinealectomy
Scoliosis
Issue Date2006
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 2006, v. 31 n. 18, p. 2043-2047 How to Cite?
AbstractSTUDY DESIGN. The 2[I]iodomelatonin binding assay was used to investigate the involvement of melatonin receptors in the development of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens. OBJECTIVE. To compare the binding properties of melatonin receptors in the thoracic spinal cord between pinealectomized chickens that had scoliosis develop and those that did not. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Surgical pinealectomy in young chickens induced scoliosis with a reported incidence of 50% to 100%. The factors regulating the development of scoliosis in this animal model are unclear. Melatonin receptors have been shown in the spinal cord of chickens, but their functions are still unknown. This study addresses the question as to whether spinal cord melatonin receptors are related to the pathogenesis of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens. METHOD. Control and pinealectomized chickens were kept under controlled lighting conditions and monitored for scoliosis development. At 9-11 weeks after pinealectomy, thoracic spinal cords were removed for 2[I]iodomelatonin binding assay, and blood was collected for serum melatonin assay at either the middle of the light period or middle of the dark period. RESULTS. Pinealectomy in young chickens produced: (1) loss of diurnal variations in serum melatonin levels, (2) 50% incidence of scoliosis, and (3) attenuation in the diurnal variations in the receptor affinity to melatonin. No differences were detected in the serum melatonin levels or binding of spinal cord melatonin receptors between the pinealectomized chickens that had scoliosis develop and those that did not. CONCLUSION. Changes are detected in melatonin receptor binding after pinealectomy. However, these changes cannot account for the reason why scoliosis develops in some chickens after pinealectomy, while it does not in others. Neither low melatonin serum level nor changes in spinal cord melatonin binding can be a sole etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens. ©2006, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79720
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPoon, AMSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, DSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeong, JCYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:57:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:57:49Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2006, v. 31 n. 18, p. 2043-2047en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79720-
dc.description.abstractSTUDY DESIGN. The 2[I]iodomelatonin binding assay was used to investigate the involvement of melatonin receptors in the development of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens. OBJECTIVE. To compare the binding properties of melatonin receptors in the thoracic spinal cord between pinealectomized chickens that had scoliosis develop and those that did not. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. Surgical pinealectomy in young chickens induced scoliosis with a reported incidence of 50% to 100%. The factors regulating the development of scoliosis in this animal model are unclear. Melatonin receptors have been shown in the spinal cord of chickens, but their functions are still unknown. This study addresses the question as to whether spinal cord melatonin receptors are related to the pathogenesis of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens. METHOD. Control and pinealectomized chickens were kept under controlled lighting conditions and monitored for scoliosis development. At 9-11 weeks after pinealectomy, thoracic spinal cords were removed for 2[I]iodomelatonin binding assay, and blood was collected for serum melatonin assay at either the middle of the light period or middle of the dark period. RESULTS. Pinealectomy in young chickens produced: (1) loss of diurnal variations in serum melatonin levels, (2) 50% incidence of scoliosis, and (3) attenuation in the diurnal variations in the receptor affinity to melatonin. No differences were detected in the serum melatonin levels or binding of spinal cord melatonin receptors between the pinealectomized chickens that had scoliosis develop and those that did not. CONCLUSION. Changes are detected in melatonin receptor binding after pinealectomy. However, these changes cannot account for the reason why scoliosis develops in some chickens after pinealectomy, while it does not in others. Neither low melatonin serum level nor changes in spinal cord melatonin binding can be a sole etiologic factor in the pathogenesis of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickens. ©2006, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_HK
dc.subjectBinding propertiesen_HK
dc.subjectChickenen_HK
dc.subjectMelatonin receptoren_HK
dc.subjectPinealectomyen_HK
dc.subjectScoliosisen_HK
dc.titleChanges in melatonin receptors in relation to the development of scoliosis in pinealectomized chickensen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0887-9869&volume=31&spage=2043&epage=2047&date=2006&atitle=Changes+in+melatonin+receptors+in+relation+to+the+development+of+scoliosis+in+pinealectomized+chickensen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, AMS: amspoon@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC: cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, AMS=rp00354en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/01.brs.0000231796.49827.39en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16915086-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33747365846en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros119138en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33747365846&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume31en_HK
dc.identifier.issue18en_HK
dc.identifier.spage2043en_HK
dc.identifier.epage2047en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000239832500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, AMS=7103068868en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, DS=7403079533en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeong, JCY=35560782200en_HK

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