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Article: Continuous dynamic spinal motion analysis
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TitleContinuous dynamic spinal motion analysis
 
AuthorsWong, KWN2
Luk, KDK1
Leong, JCY3
Wong, SF1
Wong, KKY1
 
KeywordsGender
Lumbar spine
Motion
Videofluoroscopy
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
 
CitationSpine, 2006, v. 31 n. 4, p. 414-419 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000199955.87517.82
 
AbstractSTUDY DESIGN.: Continuous dynamic lumbar intervertebral flexion-extension is assessed by a videofluoroscopy with a new auto-tracking system. OBJECTIVES.: To develop and validate a new method for the continuous assessment of lumbar kinematics. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Instability of the lumbar spine is thought to be associated with low back pain, but the diagnosis remains difficult. Functional radiographs have been used for diagnosis of spinal instability but error and limitation exist, whereas videofluoroscopy provides a cost-effective way for such analysis. However, common approaches of image analysis of videofluoroscopic video are tedious and time-consuming because of the low quality of the images. Physicians have to extract the vertebrae manually in most cases; thus, continuous motion analysis is hardly achieved. METHODS.: A new system that can perform automatic vertebrae segmentation and tracking is developed. In vitro and in vivo validity were evaluated. Intervertebral flexion and extension was assessed in 30 healthy volunteers. RESULTS.: In vitro and in vivo validity tests have been conducted with good results. A linear-liked pattern of the intervertebral flexion-extension (IVFE) curves in different levels was found, and the IVFE decreased in descending order from L1-L5 at different points of range of motion in flexion. Conversely, extension is evenly contributed at different levels, and the concavity of lumbar lordosis increases steadily in backward movement. CONCLUSIONS.: The newly developed technique in assessing the dynamic lumbar motion is reliable and able to analyze the lumbar intervertebral movement from videofluoroscopic images automatically and accurately. The proposed system requires less human intervention than common approaches. It may have a potential value in the evaluation of spinal "instability" in clinical practice. ©2006, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
 
ISSN0362-2436
2013 Impact Factor: 2.447
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000199955.87517.82
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000235340900007
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWong, KWN
 
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDK
 
dc.contributor.authorLeong, JCY
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, SF
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, KKY
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:57:20Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:57:20Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractSTUDY DESIGN.: Continuous dynamic lumbar intervertebral flexion-extension is assessed by a videofluoroscopy with a new auto-tracking system. OBJECTIVES.: To develop and validate a new method for the continuous assessment of lumbar kinematics. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Instability of the lumbar spine is thought to be associated with low back pain, but the diagnosis remains difficult. Functional radiographs have been used for diagnosis of spinal instability but error and limitation exist, whereas videofluoroscopy provides a cost-effective way for such analysis. However, common approaches of image analysis of videofluoroscopic video are tedious and time-consuming because of the low quality of the images. Physicians have to extract the vertebrae manually in most cases; thus, continuous motion analysis is hardly achieved. METHODS.: A new system that can perform automatic vertebrae segmentation and tracking is developed. In vitro and in vivo validity were evaluated. Intervertebral flexion and extension was assessed in 30 healthy volunteers. RESULTS.: In vitro and in vivo validity tests have been conducted with good results. A linear-liked pattern of the intervertebral flexion-extension (IVFE) curves in different levels was found, and the IVFE decreased in descending order from L1-L5 at different points of range of motion in flexion. Conversely, extension is evenly contributed at different levels, and the concavity of lumbar lordosis increases steadily in backward movement. CONCLUSIONS.: The newly developed technique in assessing the dynamic lumbar motion is reliable and able to analyze the lumbar intervertebral movement from videofluoroscopic images automatically and accurately. The proposed system requires less human intervention than common approaches. It may have a potential value in the evaluation of spinal "instability" in clinical practice. ©2006, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 2006, v. 31 n. 4, p. 414-419 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000199955.87517.82
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.brs.0000199955.87517.82
 
dc.identifier.epage419
 
dc.identifier.hkuros115411
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235340900007
 
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436
2013 Impact Factor: 2.447
 
dc.identifier.issue4
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16481951
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644846067
 
dc.identifier.spage414
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79677
 
dc.identifier.volume31
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofSpine
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdult
 
dc.subject.meshBiomechanics
 
dc.subject.meshDiagnostic Techniques and Procedures
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshFluoroscopy - instrumentation - methods
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshImage Processing, Computer-Assisted
 
dc.subject.meshLumbar Vertebrae - physiology - radiography
 
dc.subject.meshLumbosacral Region - physiology - radiography
 
dc.subject.meshMale
 
dc.subject.meshModels, Biological
 
dc.subject.meshMovement - physiology
 
dc.subject.meshRange of Motion, Articular - physiology
 
dc.subjectGender
 
dc.subjectLumbar spine
 
dc.subjectMotion
 
dc.subjectVideofluoroscopy
 
dc.titleContinuous dynamic spinal motion analysis
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Wong, KKY</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>STUDY DESIGN.: Continuous dynamic lumbar intervertebral flexion-extension is assessed by a videofluoroscopy with a new auto-tracking system. OBJECTIVES.: To develop and validate a new method for the continuous assessment of lumbar kinematics. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Instability of the lumbar spine is thought to be associated with low back pain, but the diagnosis remains difficult. Functional radiographs have been used for diagnosis of spinal instability but error and limitation exist, whereas videofluoroscopy provides a cost-effective way for such analysis. However, common approaches of image analysis of videofluoroscopic video are tedious and time-consuming because of the low quality of the images. Physicians have to extract the vertebrae manually in most cases; thus, continuous motion analysis is hardly achieved. METHODS.: A new system that can perform automatic vertebrae segmentation and tracking is developed. In vitro and in vivo validity were evaluated. Intervertebral flexion and extension was assessed in 30 healthy volunteers. RESULTS.: In vitro and in vivo validity tests have been conducted with good results. A linear-liked pattern of the intervertebral flexion-extension (IVFE) curves in different levels was found, and the IVFE decreased in descending order from L1-L5 at different points of range of motion in flexion. Conversely, extension is evenly contributed at different levels, and the concavity of lumbar lordosis increases steadily in backward movement. CONCLUSIONS.: The newly developed technique in assessing the dynamic lumbar motion is reliable and able to analyze the lumbar intervertebral movement from videofluoroscopic images automatically and accurately. The proposed system requires less human intervention than common approaches. It may have a potential value in the evaluation of spinal &quot;instability&quot; in clinical practice. &#169;2006, Lippincott Williams &amp; Wilkins, Inc.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Queen Elizabeth Hospital Hong Kong
  3. The Open University of Hong Kong