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Article: Spinal stenosis above a healed tuberculous kyphosis: A case report

TitleSpinal stenosis above a healed tuberculous kyphosis: A case report
Authors
Keywordskyphosis
paraplegia
spinal tuberculosis
thoracic hyperlordosis
Issue Date1996
PublisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.com
Citation
Spine, 1996, v. 21 n. 9, p. 1098-1101 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Design. This case report illustrates two patients with paraplegic of late onset resulting from cord compression in the hyperlordotic thoracic or thoracolumbar spina proximal to a healed tuberculous kyphosis. Objectives. The objective of this paper is to highlight that degenerative stenosis of the thoracic spina proximal to a healed stable kyphosis can be a cause of paraplegic of healed disease. Summary of Background Data. Paraplegic resulting from tuberculosis of the spine can be of early or late onset. Early onset paraplegia is usually a result of cord compression by active disease. Late onset paraplegic can be due to disease reactivation, bony ridge compression, or unstable kyphosis. To our knowledge, compression of the cord proximal to a healed, stable kyphosis giving rise to paraplegic has never been reported. Methods. Patient 1 presented with symptoms of spinal claudication and progressive paraparesis. He was found to have spinal stenosis in the hyperlordotic thoracolumbar spine proximal to a healed lumbosacral tuberculous kyphosis. Patient 2 presented with a 2-year history of progressive paraplegic. Imaging revealed cord compression at the hyperlordotic T10-11 segment by disc protrusion, and fecal hypertrophy. Results. Laminectomy successfully relieved the first patient of all symptoms but the second patient had significant deterioration of the neurologic status after surgery. Conclusion. Compensatory hyperlordosis of the thoracic or thoracolumbar spine commonly occurs in patients with severe tuberculous thoracolumbar or lumbosacral kyphosis. Degenerative spinal stenosis and cord compression at such hyperlordotic segment can cause late onset paraplegia. The blood supply of these chronically compressed cords is precarious and the risk of surgery is high.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79597
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.439
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.459
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKrishna, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:56:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:56:27Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_HK
dc.identifier.citationSpine, 1996, v. 21 n. 9, p. 1098-1101en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0362-2436en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79597-
dc.description.abstractStudy Design. This case report illustrates two patients with paraplegic of late onset resulting from cord compression in the hyperlordotic thoracic or thoracolumbar spina proximal to a healed tuberculous kyphosis. Objectives. The objective of this paper is to highlight that degenerative stenosis of the thoracic spina proximal to a healed stable kyphosis can be a cause of paraplegic of healed disease. Summary of Background Data. Paraplegic resulting from tuberculosis of the spine can be of early or late onset. Early onset paraplegia is usually a result of cord compression by active disease. Late onset paraplegic can be due to disease reactivation, bony ridge compression, or unstable kyphosis. To our knowledge, compression of the cord proximal to a healed, stable kyphosis giving rise to paraplegic has never been reported. Methods. Patient 1 presented with symptoms of spinal claudication and progressive paraparesis. He was found to have spinal stenosis in the hyperlordotic thoracolumbar spine proximal to a healed lumbosacral tuberculous kyphosis. Patient 2 presented with a 2-year history of progressive paraplegic. Imaging revealed cord compression at the hyperlordotic T10-11 segment by disc protrusion, and fecal hypertrophy. Results. Laminectomy successfully relieved the first patient of all symptoms but the second patient had significant deterioration of the neurologic status after surgery. Conclusion. Compensatory hyperlordosis of the thoracic or thoracolumbar spine commonly occurs in patients with severe tuberculous thoracolumbar or lumbosacral kyphosis. Degenerative spinal stenosis and cord compression at such hyperlordotic segment can cause late onset paraplegia. The blood supply of these chronically compressed cords is precarious and the risk of surgery is high.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherLippincott, Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.spinejournal.comen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofSpineen_HK
dc.subjectkyphosisen_HK
dc.subjectparaplegiaen_HK
dc.subjectspinal tuberculosisen_HK
dc.subjectthoracic hyperlordosisen_HK
dc.titleSpinal stenosis above a healed tuberculous kyphosis: A case reporten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0887-9869&volume=21&issue=9&spage=1098&epage=1101&date=1996&atitle=Spinal+stenosis+above+a+healed+tuberculous+kyphosis:+a+case+reporten_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK:hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/00007632-199605010-00022en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid8724098-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0029979672en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros12498en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros10885-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0029979672&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue9en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1098en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1101en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996UJ24800022-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrishna, M=7103387054en_HK

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