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Article: Strengthening mechanisms of bone bonding to crystalline hydroxyapatite in vivo

TitleStrengthening mechanisms of bone bonding to crystalline hydroxyapatite in vivo
Authors
KeywordsBone
HRTEM
Hydroxyapatite
In vivo
Interface
Issue Date2004
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials
Citation
Biomaterials, 2004, v. 25 n. 18, p. 4243-4254 How to Cite?
AbstractThe formation and strengthening mechanisms of bone bonding of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. A series of results were obtained: (i) a layer of amorphous HA, which has almost the same chemistry as the implanted HA, was formed on the surface of crystalline HA particles prior to dissolution; (ii) at 3 months a bone-like tissue formed a bonding zone between mature bone and the HA implant, composed of nanocrystalline and amorphous apatite; and (iii) at 6 months, mature bone was in direct contact with HA particles, and collagen fibres were perpendicularly inserted into the surface layer of implanted HA crystals. Findings (i) and (ii) indicated the following dissolution-precipitation process. (i) The crystalline HA transforms into amorphous HA; (ii) the amorphous HA dissolves into the surrounding solution, resulting in over-saturation; and (iii) the nanocrystallites are precipitated from the over-saturated solution in the presence of collagen fibres. A preliminary analysis indicated several conclusions: (i) the transition from crystalline to amorphous HA might be the controlling step in the bone bonding of crystalline HA; (ii) biological interdigitation (or incorporation) of collagen fibres with HA and chemical bonding of a apatite layer were both necessary to strengthen and toughen a bone bond, not only for the bonding between bone and HA at 6 months, but also for the bonding zone at 3 months, which would otherwise be very fragile due to the inherited brittleness of polycrystalline ceramics; and (iii) perpendicular interdigitation is an effective way for collagen fibres to impart their unique combination of flexibility and strength to the interface which they are keying. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79453
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.387
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.565
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, QZen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, CTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLu, WWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, KMCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeong, JCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLuk, KDKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:54:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:54:51Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationBiomaterials, 2004, v. 25 n. 18, p. 4243-4254en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0142-9612en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79453-
dc.description.abstractThe formation and strengthening mechanisms of bone bonding of crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. A series of results were obtained: (i) a layer of amorphous HA, which has almost the same chemistry as the implanted HA, was formed on the surface of crystalline HA particles prior to dissolution; (ii) at 3 months a bone-like tissue formed a bonding zone between mature bone and the HA implant, composed of nanocrystalline and amorphous apatite; and (iii) at 6 months, mature bone was in direct contact with HA particles, and collagen fibres were perpendicularly inserted into the surface layer of implanted HA crystals. Findings (i) and (ii) indicated the following dissolution-precipitation process. (i) The crystalline HA transforms into amorphous HA; (ii) the amorphous HA dissolves into the surrounding solution, resulting in over-saturation; and (iii) the nanocrystallites are precipitated from the over-saturated solution in the presence of collagen fibres. A preliminary analysis indicated several conclusions: (i) the transition from crystalline to amorphous HA might be the controlling step in the bone bonding of crystalline HA; (ii) biological interdigitation (or incorporation) of collagen fibres with HA and chemical bonding of a apatite layer were both necessary to strengthen and toughen a bone bond, not only for the bonding between bone and HA at 6 months, but also for the bonding zone at 3 months, which would otherwise be very fragile due to the inherited brittleness of polycrystalline ceramics; and (iii) perpendicular interdigitation is an effective way for collagen fibres to impart their unique combination of flexibility and strength to the interface which they are keying. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterialsen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofBiomaterialsen_HK
dc.rightsBiomaterials. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectBoneen_HK
dc.subjectHRTEMen_HK
dc.subjectHydroxyapatiteen_HK
dc.subjectIn vivoen_HK
dc.subjectInterfaceen_HK
dc.titleStrengthening mechanisms of bone bonding to crystalline hydroxyapatite in vivoen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0142-9612&volume=25&spage=4243&epage=4254&date=2004&atitle=Strengthening+mechanisms+of+bone+bonding+to+crystalline+hydroxyapatite+in+vivoen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLu, WW:wwlu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, KMC:cheungmc@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLuk, KDK:hcm21000@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLu, WW=rp00411en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, KMC=rp00387en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, KDK=rp00333en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biomaterials.2003.11.017en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15046914-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-1642385946en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros89186en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-1642385946&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume25en_HK
dc.identifier.issue18en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4243en_HK
dc.identifier.epage4254en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000220945400032-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, QZ=8353179600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, CT=7404954512en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLu, WW=7404215221en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, KMC=7402406754en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeong, JCY=35560782200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLuk, KDK=7201921573en_HK

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