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Article: Molecular changes associated with the transmission of avian influenza A H5N1 and H9N2 viruses to humans

TitleMolecular changes associated with the transmission of avian influenza A H5N1 and H9N2 viruses to humans
Authors
KeywordsAvian influenza virus
Host range
Interspecies transmission
Phylogenetics
Issue Date2002
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32763
Citation
Journal Of Medical Virology, 2002, v. 66 n. 1, p. 107-114 How to Cite?
AbstractIn order to identify molecular changes associated with the transmission of avian influenza A H5N1 and H9N2 viruses to humans, the internal genes from these viruses were compared to sequences from other avian and human influenza A isolates. Phylogenetically, each of the internal genes of all sixteen of the human H5N1 and both of the H9N2 isolates were closely related to one another and fell into a distinct clade separate from clades formed by the same genes of other avian and human viruses. All six internal genes were most closely related to those of avian isolates circulating in Asia, indicating that reassortment with human strains had not occurred for any of these 18 isolates. Amino acids previously identified as host-specific residues were predominantly avian in the human isolates although most of the proteins also contained residues observed previously only in sequences of human influenza viruses. For the majority of the nonglycoprotein genes, three distinct subgroups could be distinguished on bootstrap analyses of the nucleotide sequences, suggesting multiple introductions of avian virus strains capable of infecting humans. The shared nonglycoprotein gene constellations of the human H5N1 and H9N2 isolates and their detection in avian isolates only since 1997 when the first human infections were detected suggest that this particular gene combination may confer the ability to infect humans and cause disease.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79299
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.998
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.015
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShaw, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorXu, Xen_HK
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKrauss, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKlimov, Aen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCox, Nen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLim, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorShortridge, Ken_HK
dc.contributor.authorSubbarao, Ken_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:53:01Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:53:01Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Virology, 2002, v. 66 n. 1, p. 107-114en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0146-6615en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79299-
dc.description.abstractIn order to identify molecular changes associated with the transmission of avian influenza A H5N1 and H9N2 viruses to humans, the internal genes from these viruses were compared to sequences from other avian and human influenza A isolates. Phylogenetically, each of the internal genes of all sixteen of the human H5N1 and both of the H9N2 isolates were closely related to one another and fell into a distinct clade separate from clades formed by the same genes of other avian and human viruses. All six internal genes were most closely related to those of avian isolates circulating in Asia, indicating that reassortment with human strains had not occurred for any of these 18 isolates. Amino acids previously identified as host-specific residues were predominantly avian in the human isolates although most of the proteins also contained residues observed previously only in sequences of human influenza viruses. For the majority of the nonglycoprotein genes, three distinct subgroups could be distinguished on bootstrap analyses of the nucleotide sequences, suggesting multiple introductions of avian virus strains capable of infecting humans. The shared nonglycoprotein gene constellations of the human H5N1 and H9N2 isolates and their detection in avian isolates only since 1997 when the first human infections were detected suggest that this particular gene combination may confer the ability to infect humans and cause disease.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/32763en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of medical virology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons, Inc.en_HK
dc.subjectAvian influenza virusen_HK
dc.subjectHost rangeen_HK
dc.subjectInterspecies transmissionen_HK
dc.subjectPhylogeneticsen_HK
dc.titleMolecular changes associated with the transmission of avian influenza A H5N1 and H9N2 viruses to humansen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0146-6615&volume=66&issue=1&spage=107&epage=114&date=2002&atitle=Molecular+changes+associated+with+the+transmission+of+avian+influenza+A+H5N1+and+H9N2+viruses+to+humans.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jmv.2118en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11748666-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036191605en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros110273en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036191605&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume66en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage107en_HK
dc.identifier.epage114en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000172560100016-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShaw, M=7401652007en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCooper, L=55085143000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXu, X=7405292365en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThompson, W=7403570411en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrauss, S=7102769210en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, N=35224383700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKlimov, A=7202593405en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCox, N=35261700100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, R=36048363100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLim, W=7202378277en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShortridge, K=7005677034en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSubbarao, K=7102213212en_HK

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