Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Time course and cellular localization of SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and RNA in lungs from fatal cases of SARS

TitleTime course and cellular localization of SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and RNA in lungs from fatal cases of SARS
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1549-1676
Citation
Plos Medicine, 2006, v. 3 n. 2, p. 0222-0229 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Cellular localization of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in the lungs of patients with SARS is important in confirming the etiological association of the virus with disease as well as in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. To our knowledge, there have been no comprehensive studies investigating viral infection at the cellular level in humans. Methods and Findings: We collected the largest series of fatal cases of SARS with autopsy material to date by merging the pathological material from two regions involved in the 2003 worldwide SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, China, and Toronto, Canada. We developed a monoclonal antibody against the SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and used it together with in situ hybridization (ISH) to analyze the autopsy lung tissues of 32 patients with SARS from Hong Kong and Toronto. We compared the results of these assays with the pulmonary pathologies and the clinical course of illness for each patient. SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and RNA were detected by immunohistochemistry and ISH, respectively, primarily in alveolar pneumocytes and, less frequently, in macrophages. Such localization was detected in four of the seven patients who died within two weeks of illness onset, and in none of the 25 patients who died later than two weeks after symptom onset. Conclusions: The pulmonary alveolar epithelium is the chief target of SARS-CoV, with macrophages infected subsequently. Viral replication appears to be limited to the first two weeks after symptom onset, with little evidence of continued widespread replication after this period. If antiviral therapy is considered for future treatment, it should be focused on this two-week period of acute clinical disease. Copyright: © 2006 Nicholls et al.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79297
ISSN
2011 Impact Factor: 16.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.667
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, JMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorButany, Jen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorBeh, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoutanen, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:52:59Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:52:59Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationPlos Medicine, 2006, v. 3 n. 2, p. 0222-0229en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1549-1277en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79297-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cellular localization of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in the lungs of patients with SARS is important in confirming the etiological association of the virus with disease as well as in understanding the pathogenesis of the disease. To our knowledge, there have been no comprehensive studies investigating viral infection at the cellular level in humans. Methods and Findings: We collected the largest series of fatal cases of SARS with autopsy material to date by merging the pathological material from two regions involved in the 2003 worldwide SARS outbreak in Hong Kong, China, and Toronto, Canada. We developed a monoclonal antibody against the SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and used it together with in situ hybridization (ISH) to analyze the autopsy lung tissues of 32 patients with SARS from Hong Kong and Toronto. We compared the results of these assays with the pulmonary pathologies and the clinical course of illness for each patient. SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and RNA were detected by immunohistochemistry and ISH, respectively, primarily in alveolar pneumocytes and, less frequently, in macrophages. Such localization was detected in four of the seven patients who died within two weeks of illness onset, and in none of the 25 patients who died later than two weeks after symptom onset. Conclusions: The pulmonary alveolar epithelium is the chief target of SARS-CoV, with macrophages infected subsequently. Viral replication appears to be limited to the first two weeks after symptom onset, with little evidence of continued widespread replication after this period. If antiviral therapy is considered for future treatment, it should be focused on this two-week period of acute clinical disease. Copyright: © 2006 Nicholls et al.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherPublic Library of Science. The Journal's web site is located at http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=index-html&issn=1549-1676en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofPLoS Medicineen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal - diagnostic use-
dc.subject.meshNucleocapsid Proteins - analysis-
dc.subject.meshSARS Virus - physiology-
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - mortality - physiopathology - virology-
dc.subject.meshVirus Replication-
dc.titleTime course and cellular localization of SARS-CoV nucleoprotein and RNA in lungs from fatal cases of SARSen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0033-3565&volume=3&issue=2&spage=e27&epage=&date=2006&atitle=Time+course+and+cellular+localization+of+SARS-CoV+nucleoprotein+and+RNA+in+lungs+from+fatal+cases+of+SARSen_HK
dc.identifier.emailNicholls, JM: jmnichol@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailBeh, SL: philipbeh@pathology.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, M: mwpik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNicholls, JM=rp00364en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityBeh, SL=rp00409en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, M=rp00348en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pmed.0030027en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16379499-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1324951-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644846103en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros114963en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33644846103&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume3en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage0222en_HK
dc.identifier.epage0229en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236937300015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNicholls, JM=7201463077en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridButany, J=7005133404en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, LLM=7005441747en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBeh, SL=6603146797en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoutanen, S=6603932528en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, M=7403907887en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats