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Article: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus as an agent of emerging and reemerging infection

TitleSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus as an agent of emerging and reemerging infection
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.
Citation
Clinical Microbiology Reviews, 2007, v. 20 n. 4, p. 660-694 How to Cite?
AbstractBefore the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003, only 12 other animal or human coronaviruses were known. The discovery of this virus was soon followed by the discovery of the civet and bat SARS-CoV and the human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1. Surveillance of coronaviruses in many animal species has increased the number on the list of coronaviruses to at least 36. The explosive nature of the first SARS epidemic, the high mortality, its transient reemergence a year later, and economic disruptions led to a rush on research of the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the virus and the disease. This research resulted in over 4,000 publications, only some of the most representative works of which could be reviewed in this article. The marked increase in the understanding of the virus and the disease within such a short time has allowed the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, antivirals, vaccines, and epidemiological and infection control measures, which could prove to be useful in randomized control trials if SARS should return. The findings that horseshoe bats are the natural reservoir for SARS-CoV-like virus and that civets are the amplification host highlight the importance of wildlife and biosecurity in farms and wet markets, which can serve as the source and amplification centers for emerging infections. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79271
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 16.187
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 8.741
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheng, VCCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwok, YYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:52:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:52:40Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Microbiology Reviews, 2007, v. 20 n. 4, p. 660-694en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0893-8512en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79271-
dc.description.abstractBefore the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003, only 12 other animal or human coronaviruses were known. The discovery of this virus was soon followed by the discovery of the civet and bat SARS-CoV and the human coronaviruses NL63 and HKU1. Surveillance of coronaviruses in many animal species has increased the number on the list of coronaviruses to at least 36. The explosive nature of the first SARS epidemic, the high mortality, its transient reemergence a year later, and economic disruptions led to a rush on research of the epidemiological, clinical, pathological, immunological, virological, and other basic scientific aspects of the virus and the disease. This research resulted in over 4,000 publications, only some of the most representative works of which could be reviewed in this article. The marked increase in the understanding of the virus and the disease within such a short time has allowed the development of diagnostic tests, animal models, antivirals, vaccines, and epidemiological and infection control measures, which could prove to be useful in randomized control trials if SARS should return. The findings that horseshoe bats are the natural reservoir for SARS-CoV-like virus and that civets are the amplification host highlight the importance of wildlife and biosecurity in farms and wet markets, which can serve as the source and amplification centers for emerging infections. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Microbiology Reviewsen_HK
dc.rightsClinical Microbiology Reviews. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCatsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCommunicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - prevention & controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshGuinea Pigsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfection Controlen_HK
dc.subject.meshSARS Virus - classification - genetics - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.titleSevere acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus as an agent of emerging and reemerging infectionen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0893-8512&volume=20&spage=660&epage=694&date=2007&atitle=Severe+acute+respiratory+syndrome+coronavirus+as+an+agent+of+emerging+and+reemerging+infectionen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/CMR.00023-07en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17934078-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35448985443en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros149568en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35448985443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume20en_HK
dc.identifier.issue4en_HK
dc.identifier.spage660en_HK
dc.identifier.epage694en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250368000006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, VCC=23670479400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwok, YY=36078716300en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike8406739-

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