File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Accelerated evolutionary rate may be responsible for the emergence of lineage-specific genes in Ascomycota

TitleAccelerated evolutionary rate may be responsible for the emergence of lineage-specific genes in Ascomycota
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00239
Citation
Journal Of Molecular Evolution, 2006, v. 63 n. 1, p. 1-11 How to Cite?
AbstractThe evolutionary origin of "orphan" genes, genes that lack sequence similarity to any known gene, remains a mystery. One suggestion has been that most orphan genes evolve rapidly so that similarity to other genes cannot be traced after a certain evolutionary distance. This can be tested by examining the divergence rates of genes with different degrees of lineage specificity. Here the lineage specificity (LS) of a gene describes the phylogenetic distribution of that gene's orthologues in related species. Highly lineage-specific genes will be distributed in fewer species in a phylogeny. In this study, we have used the complete genomes of seven ascomycotan fungi and two animals to define several levels of LS, such as Eukaryotes-core, Ascomycota-core, Euascomycetes-specific, Hemiascomycetes-specific, Aspergillus-specific, and Saccharomyces-specific. We compare the rates of gene evolution in groups of higher LS to those in groups with lower LS. Molecular evolutionary analyses indicate an increase in nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates in genes with higher LS. Several analyses suggest that LS is correlated with the evolutionary rate of the gene. This correlation is stronger than those of a number of other factors that have been proposed as predictors of a gene's evolutionary rate, including the expression level of genes, gene essentiality or dispensability, and the number of protein-protein interactions. The accelerated evolutionary rates of genes with higher LS may reflect the influence of selection and adaptive divergence during the emergence of orphan genes. These analyses suggest that accelerated rates of gene evolution may be responsible for the emergence of apparently orphan genes. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79227
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.847
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.952
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCai, JJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, DKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:52:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:52:08Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Molecular Evolution, 2006, v. 63 n. 1, p. 1-11en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2844en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79227-
dc.description.abstractThe evolutionary origin of "orphan" genes, genes that lack sequence similarity to any known gene, remains a mystery. One suggestion has been that most orphan genes evolve rapidly so that similarity to other genes cannot be traced after a certain evolutionary distance. This can be tested by examining the divergence rates of genes with different degrees of lineage specificity. Here the lineage specificity (LS) of a gene describes the phylogenetic distribution of that gene's orthologues in related species. Highly lineage-specific genes will be distributed in fewer species in a phylogeny. In this study, we have used the complete genomes of seven ascomycotan fungi and two animals to define several levels of LS, such as Eukaryotes-core, Ascomycota-core, Euascomycetes-specific, Hemiascomycetes-specific, Aspergillus-specific, and Saccharomyces-specific. We compare the rates of gene evolution in groups of higher LS to those in groups with lower LS. Molecular evolutionary analyses indicate an increase in nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates in genes with higher LS. Several analyses suggest that LS is correlated with the evolutionary rate of the gene. This correlation is stronger than those of a number of other factors that have been proposed as predictors of a gene's evolutionary rate, including the expression level of genes, gene essentiality or dispensability, and the number of protein-protein interactions. The accelerated evolutionary rates of genes with higher LS may reflect the influence of selection and adaptive divergence during the emergence of orphan genes. These analyses suggest that accelerated rates of gene evolution may be responsible for the emergence of apparently orphan genes. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00239en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Molecular Evolutionen_HK
dc.subject.meshAscomycota - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAspergillus fumigatus - classification - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCell Lineage - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Geneticen_HK
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecularen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenes, Fungalen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenetic Driften_HK
dc.subject.meshGenetic Speciationen_HK
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSaccharomyces cerevisiae - classification - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpecies Specificityen_HK
dc.titleAccelerated evolutionary rate may be responsible for the emergence of lineage-specific genes in Ascomycotaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-2844&volume=63&issue=1&spage=1&epage=11&date=2006&atitle=Accelerated+evolutionary+rate+may+be+responsible+for+the+emergence+of+lineage-specific+genes+in+ascomycota.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00239-004-0372-5en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16755356-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33745616793en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros120595en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33745616793&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume63en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1en_HK
dc.identifier.epage11en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000238711900001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCai, JJ=7403153560en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, DK=7410351143en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike2746748-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats