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Article: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in infancy

TitleEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in infancy
Authors
KeywordsAsymptomatic primary EBV infection
Hong Kong infancy
Longitudinal study
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcv
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Virology, 2001, v. 21 n. 1, p. 57-62 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to be the cause of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and has more complicated associations with several malignant diseases. These EBV associated diseases provide a strong incentive for the development of an EBV vaccine. Most primary EBV infection during infancy and early childhood is mild or subclinical. Little is known about its infection in infancy. The pattern of EBV serological response during infancy may be important for vaccine management. Objectives: this study has served to clarify the epidemiology and serology of primary EBV infection during early infancy. Study design: longitudinal serum samples from 66 Hong Kong infants were tested for EBV antibodies by immunofluorescence. Cord blood and sequential serum samples from these infants were taken at birth and then at 4-month intervals up to 2 years of age. Results: maternal antibodies were present at different levels in all cord blood specimens and in serum samples of 8 infants at 4-month of age. Evidenced by VCA-IgG seroconversion, 60.6% (40/66) infants were infected during the first 2 years of life. One episode occurred before 8 months of age but, thereafter and for the remaining 16 months of follow-up until the infants were 2 years of age, the infection occurred at essentially a constant rate affecting about 20% of the remaining seronegative infants every 4 months. Conclusions: the abrupt onset of the infection after a delay of 8 months is a remarkable feature of primary EBV infection during infancy, which implicates a protective role for maternal antibodies. Persisting maternal antibodies may additionally serve to contain the infection once it occurred. This may partly explain why, unlike during adolescence, primary EBV infection early in life is usually asymtomatic. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79214
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.647
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.503
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTam, JSLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, MHen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:51:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:51:58Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Virology, 2001, v. 21 n. 1, p. 57-62en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1386-6532en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79214-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to be the cause of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and has more complicated associations with several malignant diseases. These EBV associated diseases provide a strong incentive for the development of an EBV vaccine. Most primary EBV infection during infancy and early childhood is mild or subclinical. Little is known about its infection in infancy. The pattern of EBV serological response during infancy may be important for vaccine management. Objectives: this study has served to clarify the epidemiology and serology of primary EBV infection during early infancy. Study design: longitudinal serum samples from 66 Hong Kong infants were tested for EBV antibodies by immunofluorescence. Cord blood and sequential serum samples from these infants were taken at birth and then at 4-month intervals up to 2 years of age. Results: maternal antibodies were present at different levels in all cord blood specimens and in serum samples of 8 infants at 4-month of age. Evidenced by VCA-IgG seroconversion, 60.6% (40/66) infants were infected during the first 2 years of life. One episode occurred before 8 months of age but, thereafter and for the remaining 16 months of follow-up until the infants were 2 years of age, the infection occurred at essentially a constant rate affecting about 20% of the remaining seronegative infants every 4 months. Conclusions: the abrupt onset of the infection after a delay of 8 months is a remarkable feature of primary EBV infection during infancy, which implicates a protective role for maternal antibodies. Persisting maternal antibodies may additionally serve to contain the infection once it occurred. This may partly explain why, unlike during adolescence, primary EBV infection early in life is usually asymtomatic. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jcven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Virology. Copyright © Elsevier BV.en_HK
dc.subjectAsymptomatic primary EBV infectionen_HK
dc.subjectHong Kong infancyen_HK
dc.subjectLongitudinal studyen_HK
dc.titleEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection in infancyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1386-6532&volume=21&spage=57&epage=62&date=2000&atitle=Epstein-Barr+virus+(EBV)+infection+in+infancyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1386-6532(01)00149-4en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11255098-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035112445en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros60533en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035112445&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume21en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage57en_HK
dc.identifier.epage62en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167766800007-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=35338760600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTam, JSL=24788939600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSeto, WH=7005799377en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, MH=7202076421en_HK

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