File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Clinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus C in children and adults in Hong Kong reveals a possible distinct human rhinovirus C subgroup

TitleClinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus C in children and adults in Hong Kong reveals a possible distinct human rhinovirus C subgroup
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.org
Citation
Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2009, v. 200 n. 7, p. 1096-1103 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: A novel human rhinovirus (HRV) species, HRV-C, was recently discovered, but its clinical features and epidemiology, compared with HRV-A and HRV-B, remains poorly understood, especially in adults. METHODS: One thousand two hundred nasopharyngeal aspirate samples obtained from hospitalized children and adults during a 1-year period were subject to reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to detect HRV. The clinical and molecular epidemiology of the 3 HRV species was analyzed. RESULTS: HRVs were detected in 178 (29.7%) of 600 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from children and 42 (7%) of 600 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from adults. HRV-A was most prevalent (n=11), followed by HRV-C (n=91) and HRV-B (n=18). Although upper respiratory tract infection was the most common presentation in children, 8 (62%) of the 13 adults with HRV-C infection had pneumonia, compared with 6 (27%) of the 22 adults with HRV-A infection (P<.05). Wheezing episodes were also more common among individuals with HRV-C (37%) and HRV-A (20%) infection than among those with HRV-B (0%) infection (P<.05). Clinical and molecular data analysis revealed HRV-C as a frequent cause of community and institutionalized outbreaks. A diverse set of HRV-C genotypes was circulating throughout the year, among which a potential distinct subgroup of strains was observed. CONCLUSION: HRV-C is associated with pneumonia in adults and outbreaks of respiratory infections requiring hospitalization. A potential novel HRV-C subgroup was identified.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79195
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.344
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.000
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYip, CCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLin, AWCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorSo, LYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:51:45Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Infectious Diseases, 2009, v. 200 n. 7, p. 1096-1103en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-1899en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79195-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: A novel human rhinovirus (HRV) species, HRV-C, was recently discovered, but its clinical features and epidemiology, compared with HRV-A and HRV-B, remains poorly understood, especially in adults. METHODS: One thousand two hundred nasopharyngeal aspirate samples obtained from hospitalized children and adults during a 1-year period were subject to reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to detect HRV. The clinical and molecular epidemiology of the 3 HRV species was analyzed. RESULTS: HRVs were detected in 178 (29.7%) of 600 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from children and 42 (7%) of 600 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from adults. HRV-A was most prevalent (n=11), followed by HRV-C (n=91) and HRV-B (n=18). Although upper respiratory tract infection was the most common presentation in children, 8 (62%) of the 13 adults with HRV-C infection had pneumonia, compared with 6 (27%) of the 22 adults with HRV-A infection (P<.05). Wheezing episodes were also more common among individuals with HRV-C (37%) and HRV-A (20%) infection than among those with HRV-B (0%) infection (P<.05). Clinical and molecular data analysis revealed HRV-C as a frequent cause of community and institutionalized outbreaks. A diverse set of HRV-C genotypes was circulating throughout the year, among which a potential distinct subgroup of strains was observed. CONCLUSION: HRV-C is associated with pneumonia in adults and outbreaks of respiratory infections requiring hospitalization. A potential novel HRV-C subgroup was identified.-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://jid.oxfordjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshMolecular Epidemiology-
dc.subject.meshPicornaviridae Infections - epidemiology - virology-
dc.subject.meshRhinovirus - classification - genetics-
dc.subject.meshSeasons-
dc.titleClinical and molecular epidemiology of human rhinovirus C in children and adults in Hong Kong reveals a possible distinct human rhinovirus C subgroupen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-1899&volume=200&issue=7&spage=1096&epage=1103&date=2009&atitle=Clinical+and+molecular+epidemiology+of+human+rhinovirus+C+in+children+and+adults+in+Hong+Kong+reveals+a+possible+distinct+human+rhinovirus+C+subgroupen_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP: skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYip, CCY: h0147879@graduate.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY: pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/605697-
dc.identifier.pmid19708791-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349334510-
dc.identifier.hkuros166904en_HK
dc.identifier.volume200-
dc.identifier.issue7-
dc.identifier.spage1096-
dc.identifier.epage1103-
dc.identifier.eissn1537-6613-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269475000012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.citeulike5659956-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats