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Article: Identification by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of an Enterobacteriaceae species with ambiguous biochemical profile from a renal transplant recipient

TitleIdentification by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of an Enterobacteriaceae species with ambiguous biochemical profile from a renal transplant recipient
Authors
Issue Date2001
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diagmicrobio
Citation
Diagnostic Microbiology And Infectious Disease, 2001, v. 39 n. 2, p. 85-93 How to Cite?
AbstractTraditional ways of identification of bacteria by phenotypic characteristics cannot be used for non-cultivable organisms and organisms with unusual biochemical profiles. In this study, an Enterobacteriaceae was isolated in pure growth from the mid-stream urine of a 67-year old renal transplant recipient with urinary tract infection. Conventional biochemical tests did not reveal a pattern resembling any known member of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The Vitek system (GNI+) showed that it was 18% Leclercia adecarboxylata and 55% Klebsiella ozaenae; whereas the API system (20E) showed that it was 99.8% Rahnella aquatilis. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing showed that there was 7 base differences between the isolate and Enterobacter cloacae, 18 base differences between the isolate and Enterobacter asburiae, 17 base differences between the isolate and Enterobacter cancerogenus, 35 base differences between the isolate and K. ozaenae, 27 base differences between the isolate and L. adecarboxylata, and 72 base differences between the isolate and R. aquatilis, indicating that the isolate most closely resembled a strain of E. cloacae. Identification of the organism in this study is important, as the choice of antibiotics would be radically different. In this case, cephalosporins should be avoided regardless of in-vitro susceptibility as cephalosporins are well-known to select for AmpC derepressed mutants in Enterobacter, and previous administration of third-generation cephalosporins is more likely to be associated with multidrug resistant Enterobacter isolates than is administration of antibiotics that do not include a third-generation cephalosporin. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79167
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.45
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.142
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheung, EYLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:51:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:51:24Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_HK
dc.identifier.citationDiagnostic Microbiology And Infectious Disease, 2001, v. 39 n. 2, p. 85-93en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0732-8893en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79167-
dc.description.abstractTraditional ways of identification of bacteria by phenotypic characteristics cannot be used for non-cultivable organisms and organisms with unusual biochemical profiles. In this study, an Enterobacteriaceae was isolated in pure growth from the mid-stream urine of a 67-year old renal transplant recipient with urinary tract infection. Conventional biochemical tests did not reveal a pattern resembling any known member of the Enterobacteriaceae family. The Vitek system (GNI+) showed that it was 18% Leclercia adecarboxylata and 55% Klebsiella ozaenae; whereas the API system (20E) showed that it was 99.8% Rahnella aquatilis. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing showed that there was 7 base differences between the isolate and Enterobacter cloacae, 18 base differences between the isolate and Enterobacter asburiae, 17 base differences between the isolate and Enterobacter cancerogenus, 35 base differences between the isolate and K. ozaenae, 27 base differences between the isolate and L. adecarboxylata, and 72 base differences between the isolate and R. aquatilis, indicating that the isolate most closely resembled a strain of E. cloacae. Identification of the organism in this study is important, as the choice of antibiotics would be radically different. In this case, cephalosporins should be avoided regardless of in-vitro susceptibility as cephalosporins are well-known to select for AmpC derepressed mutants in Enterobacter, and previous administration of third-generation cephalosporins is more likely to be associated with multidrug resistant Enterobacter isolates than is administration of antibiotics that do not include a third-generation cephalosporin. © 2001 Elsevier Science Inc.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/diagmicrobioen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Diseaseen_HK
dc.rightsDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease. Copyright © Elsevier Inc.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshBacterial Typing Techniquesen_HK
dc.subject.meshBase Sequenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnterobacter cloacae - classificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnterobacteriaceae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshEnterobacteriaceae Infections - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenes, rRNA - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantation - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Ribosomal, 16S - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, DNAen_HK
dc.titleIdentification by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing of an Enterobacteriaceae species with ambiguous biochemical profile from a renal transplant recipienten_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0732-8893&volume=39&spage=85&epage=93&date=2001&atitle=Identification+by+16S+ribosomal+RNA+gene+sequencing+of+an+Enterobacteriaceae+species+with+ambiguous+biochemical+profile+from+a+renal+transplant+recipienten_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0732-8893(01)00206-1en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid11248520-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035097461en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros62012en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035097461&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume39en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage85en_HK
dc.identifier.epage93en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000167613000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, EYL=36853286600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KW=7401860831en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

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