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Conference Paper: The quest of influenza a viruses for new hosts

TitleThe quest of influenza a viruses for new hosts
Authors
KeywordsAvian influenza
Chickens
Ducks
Lineages
Live poultry markets
Pigeons
Quail
Recombinant fowl pox
Vaccines
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican Association of Avian Pathologists, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://avdi.allenpress.com/avdionline/?request=index-html
Citation
Avian Diseases, 2003, v. 47 SPEC. ISS., p. 849-856 How to Cite?
AbstractThere is increasing evidence that stable lineages of influenza viruses are being established in chickens. H9N2 viruses are established in chickens in Eurasia, and there are increasing reports of H3N2, H6N1, and H6N2 influenza viruses in chickens both in Asia and North America. Surveillance in a live poultry market in Nanchang, South Central China, reveals that influenza viruses were isolated form 1% of fecal samples taken from healthy poultry over the course of 16 months. The highest isolation rates were from chickens (1.3%) and ducks (1.2%), followed by quail (0.8%), then pigeon (0.5%). H3N6, H9N2, H2N9, and H4N6 viruses were isolated from multiple samples, while single isolates of H1N1, H3N2, and H3N3 viruses were made. Representatives of each virus subtype were experimentally inoculated into both quail and chickens. All the viruses replicated in the trachea of quail, but efficient replication in chickens was confined to 25% of the tested isolates. In quail, these viruses were shed primarily by the aerosol route, raising the possibility that quail may be the «route modulator» that changes the route of transmission of influenza viruses from fecal-oral to aerosol transmission. Thus, quail may play an important role in the natural history of influenza viruses. The pros and cons of the use of inactivated and recombinant fowl pox-influenza vaccines to control the spread of avian influenza are also evaluated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79147
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.104
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.772
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Men_HK
dc.contributor.authorHe, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebby, RJen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPerez, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:51:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:51:09Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationAvian Diseases, 2003, v. 47 SPEC. ISS., p. 849-856en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0005-2086en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79147-
dc.description.abstractThere is increasing evidence that stable lineages of influenza viruses are being established in chickens. H9N2 viruses are established in chickens in Eurasia, and there are increasing reports of H3N2, H6N1, and H6N2 influenza viruses in chickens both in Asia and North America. Surveillance in a live poultry market in Nanchang, South Central China, reveals that influenza viruses were isolated form 1% of fecal samples taken from healthy poultry over the course of 16 months. The highest isolation rates were from chickens (1.3%) and ducks (1.2%), followed by quail (0.8%), then pigeon (0.5%). H3N6, H9N2, H2N9, and H4N6 viruses were isolated from multiple samples, while single isolates of H1N1, H3N2, and H3N3 viruses were made. Representatives of each virus subtype were experimentally inoculated into both quail and chickens. All the viruses replicated in the trachea of quail, but efficient replication in chickens was confined to 25% of the tested isolates. In quail, these viruses were shed primarily by the aerosol route, raising the possibility that quail may be the «route modulator» that changes the route of transmission of influenza viruses from fecal-oral to aerosol transmission. Thus, quail may play an important role in the natural history of influenza viruses. The pros and cons of the use of inactivated and recombinant fowl pox-influenza vaccines to control the spread of avian influenza are also evaluated.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Avian Pathologists, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://avdi.allenpress.com/avdionline/?request=index-htmlen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofAvian Diseasesen_HK
dc.subjectAvian influenzaen_HK
dc.subjectChickensen_HK
dc.subjectDucksen_HK
dc.subjectLineagesen_HK
dc.subjectLive poultry marketsen_HK
dc.subjectPigeonsen_HK
dc.subjectQuailen_HK
dc.subjectRecombinant fowl poxen_HK
dc.subjectVaccinesen_HK
dc.titleThe quest of influenza a viruses for new hostsen_HK
dc.typeConference_Paperen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0005-2086&volume=47&issue=3 Suppl&spage=849&epage=56&date=2003&atitle=The+quest+of+influenza+A+viruses+for+new+hostsen_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid14575076-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0141566330en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87571en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0141566330&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume47en_HK
dc.identifier.issueSPEC. ISS.en_HK
dc.identifier.spage849en_HK
dc.identifier.epage856en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185516000015-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, M=44561357600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, M=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, S=8927685600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebby, RJ=35448064800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerez, D=7101996480en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, RG=36048363100en_HK

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