Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: A prospective study of symptomatic bacteremia following platelet transfusion and of its management

TitleA prospective study of symptomatic bacteremia following platelet transfusion and of its management
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/TRF
Citation
Transfusion, 1994, v. 34 n. 11, p. 950-954 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The danger of bacteremia due to contaminated platelets is not well known. There are also no established guidelines for the management of febrile reactions after platelet transfusion. Study Design and Methods: To determine the risk of symptomatic bacteremia after platelet transfusion, 3584 platelet transfusions given to 161 patients after bone marrow transplantation were prospectively studied. Platelet bags were routinely refrigerated for 24 hours after transfusion. Septic work- up was initiated for a temperature rise of more than 2°C above the pretransfusion value within 24 hours of platelet transfusion or a temperature rise of more than 1°C that was associated with chills and rigor. Diagnosis of bacteremia after platelet transfusion was made only when the pairs of isolates from the blood and the platelet bags were identical with respect to their biochemical profile, antibiotic sensitivity, serotyping, or ribotyping. Results: Thirty-seven febrile reactions, as defined above, occurred. Bacteremia subsequent to platelet transfusion was diagnosed in 10 cases. There was a 27-percent chance (95% CI, 15- 43%) that these febrile reactions represented bacteremia that resulted from platelet transfusion. For a subgroup of 19 patients with a temperature rise of more than 2°C, the risk of bacteremia was 42 percent (95% CI, 23-64%). Septic shock occurred in 4 of the 10 bacteremic patients. A rapid diagnosis was possible because the involved bacteria were demonstrated by direct Gram stain of the samples taken from the platelet bags of all 10 patients. Conclusion: Significant febrile reactions after platelet transfusion are highly likely to be indicative of bacteremia. Routine retention of platelet bags for subsequent microbiologic study was useful in the investigation of these febrile reactions. Empiric antibiotic therapy is indicated.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79118
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.042
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.537
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, EKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLie, AKWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLee, ACWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKwong, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNg, MHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TKen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:50:49Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:50:49Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_HK
dc.identifier.citationTransfusion, 1994, v. 34 n. 11, p. 950-954en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0041-1132en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79118-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The danger of bacteremia due to contaminated platelets is not well known. There are also no established guidelines for the management of febrile reactions after platelet transfusion. Study Design and Methods: To determine the risk of symptomatic bacteremia after platelet transfusion, 3584 platelet transfusions given to 161 patients after bone marrow transplantation were prospectively studied. Platelet bags were routinely refrigerated for 24 hours after transfusion. Septic work- up was initiated for a temperature rise of more than 2°C above the pretransfusion value within 24 hours of platelet transfusion or a temperature rise of more than 1°C that was associated with chills and rigor. Diagnosis of bacteremia after platelet transfusion was made only when the pairs of isolates from the blood and the platelet bags were identical with respect to their biochemical profile, antibiotic sensitivity, serotyping, or ribotyping. Results: Thirty-seven febrile reactions, as defined above, occurred. Bacteremia subsequent to platelet transfusion was diagnosed in 10 cases. There was a 27-percent chance (95% CI, 15- 43%) that these febrile reactions represented bacteremia that resulted from platelet transfusion. For a subgroup of 19 patients with a temperature rise of more than 2°C, the risk of bacteremia was 42 percent (95% CI, 23-64%). Septic shock occurred in 4 of the 10 bacteremic patients. A rapid diagnosis was possible because the involved bacteria were demonstrated by direct Gram stain of the samples taken from the platelet bags of all 10 patients. Conclusion: Significant febrile reactions after platelet transfusion are highly likely to be indicative of bacteremia. Routine retention of platelet bags for subsequent microbiologic study was useful in the investigation of these febrile reactions. Empiric antibiotic therapy is indicated.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/TRFen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofTransfusionen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteremia - complications - epidemiology - etiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteria - isolation & purificationen_HK
dc.subject.meshBlood Platelets - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshFever - etiology - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshIncidenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshPlatelet Transfusion - adverse effectsen_HK
dc.subject.meshProspective Studiesen_HK
dc.titleA prospective study of symptomatic bacteremia following platelet transfusion and of its managementen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0041-1132&volume=34&issue=11&spage=950&epage=954&date=1994&atitle=A+prospective+study+of+symptomatic+bacteremia+following+platelet+transfusion+and+of+its+managementen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, EKW: ekwchiu@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLie, AKW: akwlie@HKUCC.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKwong, YL: ylkwong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLiang, R: rliang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLiang, R=rp00345en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKwong, YL=rp00358en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1537-2995.1994.341195065031.x-
dc.identifier.pmid7974703-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0027997859en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros4356en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros4565-
dc.identifier.volume34en_HK
dc.identifier.issue11en_HK
dc.identifier.spage950en_HK
dc.identifier.epage954en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994PU13600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, EKW=24827833600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLie, AKW=24284842400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, R=26643224900en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, ACW=7405631431en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKwong, YL=7102818954en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, S=7404590959en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNg, MH=7202076421en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TK=7402687762en_HK
dc.customcontrol.immutablesml 130530-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats