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Article: Bats as a continuing source of emerging infections in humans

TitleBats as a continuing source of emerging infections in humans
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5616
Citation
Reviews In Medical Virology, 2007, v. 17 n. 2, p. 67-91 How to Cite?
AbstractAmongst the 60 viral species reported to be associated with bats, 59 are RNA viruses, which are potentially important in the generation of emerging and re-emerging infections in humans. The prime examples of these are the lyssaviruses and Henipavirus. The transmission of Nipah, Hendra and perhaps SARS coronavirus and Ebola virus to humans may involve intermediate amplification hosts such as pigs, horses, civets and primates, respectively. Understanding of the natural reservoir or introductory host, the amplifying host, the epidemic centre and at-risk human populations are crucial in the control of emerging zoonosis. The association between the bat coronaviruses and certain lyssaviruses with particular bat species implies co-evolution between specific viruses and bat hosts. Cross-infection between the huge number of bat species may generate new viruses which are able to jump the trans-mammalian species barrier more efficiently. The currently known viruses that have been found in bats are reviewed and the risks of transmission to humans are highlighted. Certain families of bats including the Pteropodidae, Molossidae, Phyllostomidae, and Vespertilionidae are most frequently associated with known human pathogens. A systematic survey of bats is warranted to better understand the ecology of these viruses. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79094
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.308
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.208
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Pen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:50:31Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:50:31Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationReviews In Medical Virology, 2007, v. 17 n. 2, p. 67-91en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1052-9276en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79094-
dc.description.abstractAmongst the 60 viral species reported to be associated with bats, 59 are RNA viruses, which are potentially important in the generation of emerging and re-emerging infections in humans. The prime examples of these are the lyssaviruses and Henipavirus. The transmission of Nipah, Hendra and perhaps SARS coronavirus and Ebola virus to humans may involve intermediate amplification hosts such as pigs, horses, civets and primates, respectively. Understanding of the natural reservoir or introductory host, the amplifying host, the epidemic centre and at-risk human populations are crucial in the control of emerging zoonosis. The association between the bat coronaviruses and certain lyssaviruses with particular bat species implies co-evolution between specific viruses and bat hosts. Cross-infection between the huge number of bat species may generate new viruses which are able to jump the trans-mammalian species barrier more efficiently. The currently known viruses that have been found in bats are reviewed and the risks of transmission to humans are highlighted. Certain families of bats including the Pteropodidae, Molossidae, Phyllostomidae, and Vespertilionidae are most frequently associated with known human pathogens. A systematic survey of bats is warranted to better understand the ecology of these viruses. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5616en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofReviews in Medical Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsReviews in Medical Virology. Copyright © John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshChiroptera - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirs - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA Virus Infections - epidemiology - transmission - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA Viruses - genetics - growth & developmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshZoonoses - epidemiology - transmission - virologyen_HK
dc.titleBats as a continuing source of emerging infections in humansen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1052-9276&volume=17&spage=67&epage=91&date=2007&atitle=Bats+as+a+continuing+source+of+emerging+infections+in+humans.en_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, S:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, S:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, P:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, S=rp00395en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, S=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, P=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/rmv.520en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17042030-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33947606743en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros135270en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33947606743&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume17en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage67en_HK
dc.identifier.epage91en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245379000002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, S=13310021400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, S=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, P=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1160441-

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