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Article: Virologically confirmed population-based burden of hospitalization caused by influenza a and b among children in Hong Kong

TitleVirologically confirmed population-based burden of hospitalization caused by influenza a and b among children in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/
Citation
Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2009, v. 49 n. 7, p. 1016-1021 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. We sought to determine the virologically confirmed hospitalization rates associated with influenza virus infection among Hong Kong children. Methods. Patients <18 years of age who lived on Hong Kong Island (a separate island within Hong Kong) and were admitted to either of the only 2 public hospitals on the island for a febrile acute respiratory infection on 1 fixed day of the week in each hospital from October 2003 through September 2006 were prospectively recruited. These 2 hospitals together accounted for 72.5% of all general pediatric admissions in Hong Kong Island with a known population denominator. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from all recruited patients and were tested for influenza A and influenza B viruses by direct antigen detection and culture. Results. All cases of influenza A during 2003-2004 were caused by H3N2 virus, whereas 85.7% of cases during 2004-2005 were due to H3N2 virus, and 93.5% during 2005-2006 were due to H1N1 virus. During 2004-2005, infants <1 year of age had the highest rate of hospitalization for influenza A (103.8 cases per 10,000 population), whereas children 1 year of age had the highest rate of hospitalization during the other 2 seasons (95.5 and 54.6 cases per 10,000 population during 2003-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively). A protection rate of 25%, presumably attributable to maternal antibodies, was seen in infants <1 year of age who were hospitalized during 2003-2004 with infection due to an H3N2 virus that had been in circulation. The hospitalization rates for influenza B were highest among children 2-4 years of age. Conclusions. This population-based study of hospitalizations due to virologically confirmed influenza demonstrated a very high burden of disease among young children in Hong Kong. The morbidity varied with virus type, subtype, and antigenic variants. © 2009 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79049
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.736
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.742
ISI Accession Number ID
Funding AgencyGrant Number
Council of Hong KongHKU 7396/03M
Hong Kong Special Administrative Region GovernmentAoE/M-12/06
Funding Information:

Research Grants Council of Hong Kong (HKU 7396/03M) and the Area of Excellence Scheme of the University Grants Committee (grant AoE/M-12/06) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government.

References
Grants

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChiu, SSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYoung, BWen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLim, Wen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, YLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:49:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:49:58Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_HK
dc.identifier.citationClinical Infectious Diseases, 2009, v. 49 n. 7, p. 1016-1021en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1058-4838en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79049-
dc.description.abstractBackground. We sought to determine the virologically confirmed hospitalization rates associated with influenza virus infection among Hong Kong children. Methods. Patients <18 years of age who lived on Hong Kong Island (a separate island within Hong Kong) and were admitted to either of the only 2 public hospitals on the island for a febrile acute respiratory infection on 1 fixed day of the week in each hospital from October 2003 through September 2006 were prospectively recruited. These 2 hospitals together accounted for 72.5% of all general pediatric admissions in Hong Kong Island with a known population denominator. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were obtained from all recruited patients and were tested for influenza A and influenza B viruses by direct antigen detection and culture. Results. All cases of influenza A during 2003-2004 were caused by H3N2 virus, whereas 85.7% of cases during 2004-2005 were due to H3N2 virus, and 93.5% during 2005-2006 were due to H1N1 virus. During 2004-2005, infants <1 year of age had the highest rate of hospitalization for influenza A (103.8 cases per 10,000 population), whereas children 1 year of age had the highest rate of hospitalization during the other 2 seasons (95.5 and 54.6 cases per 10,000 population during 2003-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively). A protection rate of 25%, presumably attributable to maternal antibodies, was seen in infants <1 year of age who were hospitalized during 2003-2004 with infection due to an H3N2 virus that had been in circulation. The hospitalization rates for influenza B were highest among children 2-4 years of age. Conclusions. This population-based study of hospitalizations due to virologically confirmed influenza demonstrated a very high burden of disease among young children in Hong Kong. The morbidity varied with virus type, subtype, and antigenic variants. © 2009 by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/cid/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Infectious Diseasesen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subject.meshHospitalization - statistics and numerical data-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza B virus - isolation and purification-
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - pathology - virology-
dc.titleVirologically confirmed population-based burden of hospitalization caused by influenza a and b among children in Hong Kongen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1058-4838&volume=49&issue=7&spage=1016&epage=1021&date=2009&atitle=Virologically+confirmed+population-based+burden+of+hospitalization+caused+by+influenza+A+and+B+among+children+in+Hong+Kongen_HK
dc.identifier.emailChiu, SS: ssschiu@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChiu, SS=rp00421en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/605570en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid19722912-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-70349923413en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros166282en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-70349923413&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume49en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1016en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1021en_HK
dc.identifier.eissn1537-6591-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269672300005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.relation.projectA population based study of hospitalization disease burden for respiratory viral infections in children-
dc.relation.projectControl of Pandemic and Inter-pandemic Influenza-
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, SS=7202291500en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=7406034307en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=35181123000en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYoung, BW=10143525400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLim, W=7202378277en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WHS=13310222200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, YL=7201403380en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike5719352-

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