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Article: The spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004.

TitleThe spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004.
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherSpringer-Verlag Wien. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.at/archvirol
Citation
Archives Of Virology. Supplementum., 2005 n. 19, p. 117-129 How to Cite?
AbstractH5N1 avian influenza has spread to eight countries in eastern Asia including China, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Indonesia in early 2004. This H5N1 influenza A virus is extremely virulent in poultry including chickens and ducks, killing millions of birds throughout the region. Additionally this virus has transmitted to humans (mainly children) in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand, killing 54 of 100 diagnosed persons. To control this epidemic hundreds of millions of chickens and ducks have been culled. One genotype of H5N1 designated "Z" has become dominant in Asia. This virus was first detected in wild birds in Hong Kong in November 2002 and was antigenically distinct from H5N1 viruses isolated from 1997 to early 2002 and lethal for aquatic birds. The H5N1 virus infecting humans and poultry in Asia in 2004 is an antigenic variant of the Z genotype. Here we consider the possible role of migrating birds in the evolution and spread of the H5N1 influenza A virus throughout Asia. We conclude that the available information is consistent with a role for migrating birds but limited information is available and that serological studies are urgently needed on migrating birds worldwide. The prospect is that this H5N1/04 influenza A virus will become endemic in poultry in eastern Asia and will be a continuing threat to animal and human health. It is also projected that a human H5N1 vaccine will eventually be needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79020
ISSN
2011 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.513
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RGen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPoon, Len_HK
dc.contributor.authorKrauss, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWebby, Ren_HK
dc.contributor.authorGovorkovai, Een_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Men_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:49:37Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:49:37Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_HK
dc.identifier.citationArchives Of Virology. Supplementum., 2005 n. 19, p. 117-129en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0939-1983en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79020-
dc.description.abstractH5N1 avian influenza has spread to eight countries in eastern Asia including China, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and Indonesia in early 2004. This H5N1 influenza A virus is extremely virulent in poultry including chickens and ducks, killing millions of birds throughout the region. Additionally this virus has transmitted to humans (mainly children) in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand, killing 54 of 100 diagnosed persons. To control this epidemic hundreds of millions of chickens and ducks have been culled. One genotype of H5N1 designated "Z" has become dominant in Asia. This virus was first detected in wild birds in Hong Kong in November 2002 and was antigenically distinct from H5N1 viruses isolated from 1997 to early 2002 and lethal for aquatic birds. The H5N1 virus infecting humans and poultry in Asia in 2004 is an antigenic variant of the Z genotype. Here we consider the possible role of migrating birds in the evolution and spread of the H5N1 influenza A virus throughout Asia. We conclude that the available information is consistent with a role for migrating birds but limited information is available and that serological studies are urgently needed on migrating birds worldwide. The prospect is that this H5N1/04 influenza A virus will become endemic in poultry in eastern Asia and will be a continuing threat to animal and human health. It is also projected that a human H5N1 vaccine will eventually be needed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSpringer-Verlag Wien. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.springer.at/archvirolen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of virology. Supplementum.en_HK
dc.titleThe spread of the H5N1 bird flu epidemic in Asia in 2004.en_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0939-1983&volume=19&spage=117&epage=29&date=2005&atitle=The+spread+of+the+H5N1+bird+flu+epidemic+in+Asia+in+2004en_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPoon, L: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, M: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, L=rp00484en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, M=rp00410en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.pmid16358424-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644840382en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros118098en_HK
dc.identifier.issue19en_HK
dc.identifier.spage117en_HK
dc.identifier.epage129en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000233321600011-
dc.publisher.placeAustriaen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebster, RG=36048363100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, L=7005441747en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKrauss, S=7102769210en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWebby, R=35448064800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGovorkovai, E=12772523200en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, M=7005486823en_HK

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