File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Geographical difference of disease association in Streptococcus bovis bacteraemia

TitleGeographical difference of disease association in Streptococcus bovis bacteraemia
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.org
Citation
Journal Of Medical Microbiology, 2003, v. 52 n. 10, p. 903-908 How to Cite?
AbstractFrom 1996 to 2001, 48 Streptococcus bovis strains were isolated from blood cultures of 37 patients in one hospital. Median patient age was 68 years (range: 1 day-88 years). The male:female ratio was 23:14. Most patients (97%) had underlying diseases, including biliary tract disease in 14 (38%), diabetes mellitus in 12 (32%), liver parenchymal disease in seven (19%), carcinoma of the colon in four (11%) and other malignancies in four (11%). No infective foci (indicative of primary bacteraemia) were identified in 15 patients (40%) and 14 (38%) had acute cholangitis/ cholecystitis, but only four (11%) had infective endocarditis. Two (5%), three (8%) and 32 (87%) patients had S. bovis of biotypes 1, II/1 and II/2, respectively, and three (8%), two (5%) and 32 (87%) patients had S. bovis of genotypes 1, 2a and 2b, respectively. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin, cephalothin and vancomycin, 24 (65%) were resistant to erythromycin and 15 (41%) were resistant to clindamycin (these strains were also resistant to erythromycin). Thirteen isolates that were erythromycin- and clindamycin-resistant possessed the ermB gene, 10 possessed the ermT gene and one possessed both the ermB and ermT genes. Overall, seven patients (19%) died. In contrast to most other reports from western countries, where carcinoma of the colon and infective endocarditis were the major underlying disease and infective focus associated with S. bovis bacteraemia, biliary tract disease and acute cholangitis and/or cholecystitis were the major underlying diseases associated with S. bovis bacteraemia in our locality.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79007
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.269
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.060
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, RAen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTo, APCen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KYen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:49:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:49:27Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Medical Microbiology, 2003, v. 52 n. 10, p. 903-908en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-2615en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/79007-
dc.description.abstractFrom 1996 to 2001, 48 Streptococcus bovis strains were isolated from blood cultures of 37 patients in one hospital. Median patient age was 68 years (range: 1 day-88 years). The male:female ratio was 23:14. Most patients (97%) had underlying diseases, including biliary tract disease in 14 (38%), diabetes mellitus in 12 (32%), liver parenchymal disease in seven (19%), carcinoma of the colon in four (11%) and other malignancies in four (11%). No infective foci (indicative of primary bacteraemia) were identified in 15 patients (40%) and 14 (38%) had acute cholangitis/ cholecystitis, but only four (11%) had infective endocarditis. Two (5%), three (8%) and 32 (87%) patients had S. bovis of biotypes 1, II/1 and II/2, respectively, and three (8%), two (5%) and 32 (87%) patients had S. bovis of genotypes 1, 2a and 2b, respectively. All isolates were sensitive to penicillin, cephalothin and vancomycin, 24 (65%) were resistant to erythromycin and 15 (41%) were resistant to clindamycin (these strains were also resistant to erythromycin). Thirteen isolates that were erythromycin- and clindamycin-resistant possessed the ermB gene, 10 possessed the ermT gene and one possessed both the ermB and ermT genes. Overall, seven patients (19%) died. In contrast to most other reports from western countries, where carcinoma of the colon and infective endocarditis were the major underlying disease and infective focus associated with S. bovis bacteraemia, biliary tract disease and acute cholangitis and/or cholecystitis were the major underlying diseases associated with S. bovis bacteraemia in our locality.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherSociety for General Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jmm.sgmjournals.orgen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Medical Microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshAgeden_HK
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteremia - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshChilden_HK
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen_HK
dc.subject.meshDNA, Bacterial - chemistry - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kong - epidemiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshInfanten_HK
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newbornen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshPolymerase Chain Reactionen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Ribosomal, 16S - chemistry - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studiesen_HK
dc.subject.meshSequence Alignmenten_HK
dc.subject.meshStreptococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshStreptococcus bovis - classification - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleGeographical difference of disease association in Streptococcus bovis bacteraemiaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-2615&volume=52&spage=903&epage=8&date=2003&atitle=Geographical+difference+of+disease+association+in+Streptococcus+bovis+bacteraemiaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSY:samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSY=rp00395en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1099/jmm.0.05199-0en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid12972586en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142093121en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87980en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0142093121&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume52en_HK
dc.identifier.issue10en_HK
dc.identifier.spage903en_HK
dc.identifier.epage908en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000186073900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, RA=7408203830en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTo, APC=36828058300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSY=13310021400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, KY=36078079100en_HK

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats