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Article: Establishment of multiple sublineages of H5N1 influenza virus in Asia: Implications for pandemic control
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TitleEstablishment of multiple sublineages of H5N1 influenza virus in Asia: Implications for pandemic control
 
AuthorsChen, H2 4
Smith, GJD2 4
Li, KS4
Wang, J4
Fan, XH2
Rayner, JM2 4
Vijaykrishna, D2 4
Zhang, JX2 4
Zhang, LJ2 4
Guo, CT2
Cheung, CL2 4
Xu, KM2 4
Duan, L2 4
Huang, K2
Qin, K2 4
Leung, YHC2
Wu, WL2 4
Lu, HR2
Chen, Y1
Xia, MS1
Naipospos, TSP6
Yuen, KY2
Hassan, SS5
Bahri, S6
Nguyen, TD3
Webster, RG2 7
Peiris, JSM2 4
Guan, Y2 4
 
KeywordsAvian
Genetics
Human
Influenza A
Virus evolution
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
 
CitationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2006, v. 103 n. 8, p. 2845-2850 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0511120103
 
AbstractPreparedness for a possible influenza pandemic caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 has become a global priority. The spread of the virus to Europe and continued human infection in Southeast Asia have heightened pandemic concern. It remains unknown from where the pandemic strain may emerge; current attention is directed at Vietnam, Thailand, and, more recently, Indonesia and China. Here, we report that genetically and antigenically distinct sublineages of H5N1 virus have become established in poultry in different geographical regions of Southeast Asia, indicating the long-term endemicity of the virus, and the isolation of H5N1 virus from apparently healthy migratory birds in southern China. Our data show that H5N1 influenza virus, has continued to spread from its established source in southern China to other regions through transport of poultry and bird migration. The identification of regionally distinct sublineages contributes to the understanding of the mechanism for the perpetuation and spread of H5N1, providing information that is directly relevant to control of the source of infection in poultry. It points to the necessity of surveillance that is geographically broader than previously supposed and that includes H5N1 viruses of greater genetic and antigenic diversity. © 2006 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
 
ISSN0027-8424
2013 Impact Factor: 9.809
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0511120103
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000235554900066
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChen, H
 
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJD
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, KS
 
dc.contributor.authorWang, J
 
dc.contributor.authorFan, XH
 
dc.contributor.authorRayner, JM
 
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, D
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JX
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, LJ
 
dc.contributor.authorGuo, CT
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CL
 
dc.contributor.authorXu, KM
 
dc.contributor.authorDuan, L
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, K
 
dc.contributor.authorQin, K
 
dc.contributor.authorLeung, YHC
 
dc.contributor.authorWu, WL
 
dc.contributor.authorLu, HR
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorXia, MS
 
dc.contributor.authorNaipospos, TSP
 
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY
 
dc.contributor.authorHassan, SS
 
dc.contributor.authorBahri, S
 
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, TD
 
dc.contributor.authorWebster, RG
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Y
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:48:59Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:48:59Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractPreparedness for a possible influenza pandemic caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza A subtype H5N1 has become a global priority. The spread of the virus to Europe and continued human infection in Southeast Asia have heightened pandemic concern. It remains unknown from where the pandemic strain may emerge; current attention is directed at Vietnam, Thailand, and, more recently, Indonesia and China. Here, we report that genetically and antigenically distinct sublineages of H5N1 virus have become established in poultry in different geographical regions of Southeast Asia, indicating the long-term endemicity of the virus, and the isolation of H5N1 virus from apparently healthy migratory birds in southern China. Our data show that H5N1 influenza virus, has continued to spread from its established source in southern China to other regions through transport of poultry and bird migration. The identification of regionally distinct sublineages contributes to the understanding of the mechanism for the perpetuation and spread of H5N1, providing information that is directly relevant to control of the source of infection in poultry. It points to the necessity of surveillance that is geographically broader than previously supposed and that includes H5N1 viruses of greater genetic and antigenic diversity. © 2006 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2006, v. 103 n. 8, p. 2845-2850 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0511120103
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0511120103
 
dc.identifier.epage2850
 
dc.identifier.hkuros120654
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000235554900066
 
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
2013 Impact Factor: 9.809
 
dc.identifier.issue8
 
dc.identifier.pmid16473931
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33644526903
 
dc.identifier.spage2845
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78967
 
dc.identifier.volume103
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshAsia, Southeastern
 
dc.subject.meshBase Sequence
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaks - prevention & control
 
dc.subject.meshDucks - virology
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5N1 Subtype - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza in Birds - epidemiology - transmission - virology
 
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission - virology
 
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Data
 
dc.subject.meshPhylogeny
 
dc.subject.meshSerotyping
 
dc.subjectAvian
 
dc.subjectGenetics
 
dc.subjectHuman
 
dc.subjectInfluenza A
 
dc.subjectVirus evolution
 
dc.titleEstablishment of multiple sublineages of H5N1 influenza virus in Asia: Implications for pandemic control
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. Xiamen University
  2. The University of Hong Kong
  3. National Institute of Veterinary Research Hanoi
  4. Shantou University, Medical College (SUMC)
  5. Veterinary Research Institute - Ipoh
  6. Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesia
  7. St. Jude Children Research Hospital