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Article: The association of RANTES polymorphism with severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong and Beijing Chinese
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TitleThe association of RANTES polymorphism with severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong and Beijing Chinese
 
AuthorsNg, MW1
Zhou, G4
Chong, WP1
Lee, LWY1
Law, HKW1
Zhang, H4
Wong, WHS1
Fok, SFS1
Zhai, Y4
Yung, RWH3
Chow, EY5
Au, KL2
Chan, EYT1
Lim, W6
Peiris, JSM1
He, F4
Lau, YL1
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/
 
CitationBmc Infectious Diseases, 2007, v. 7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-7-50
 
AbstractBackground: Chemokines play important roles in inflammation and antiviral action. We examined whether polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig affect the susceptibility to and outcome of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: We tested the polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig for their associations with SARS in 495 Hong Kong Chinese SARS patients and 578 controls. Then we tried to confirm the results in 356 Beijing Chinese SARS patients and 367 controls. Results: RANTES -28 G allele was associated with SARS susceptibility in Hong Kong Chinese (P < 0.0001, OR = 2.80, 95%CI:2.11-3.71). Individuals with RANTES -28 CG and GG genotypes had a 3.28-fold (95%CI:2.32-4.64) and 3.06-fold (95%CI:1.47-6.39) increased risk of developing SARS respectively (P < 0.0001). This -28 G allele conferred risk of death in a gene-dosage dependent manner (P = 0.014) with CG and GG individuals having a 2.12-fold (95% CI: 1.11-4.06) and 4.01-fold (95% CI: 1.30-12.4) increased risk. For the replication of RANTES data in Beijing Chinese, the -28 G allele was not associated with susceptibility to SARS. However, -28 CG (OR = 4.27, 95%CI:1.64-11.1) and GG (OR = 3.34, 95%CI:0.37-30.7) were associated with admission to intensive care units or death due to SARS (P = 0.011). Conclusion: RANTES -28 G allele plays a role in the pathogenesis of SARS. © 2007 Ng et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
ISSN1471-2334
2013 Impact Factor: 2.561
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.420
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-7-50
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000247617800001
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorNg, MW
 
dc.contributor.authorZhou, G
 
dc.contributor.authorChong, WP
 
dc.contributor.authorLee, LWY
 
dc.contributor.authorLaw, HKW
 
dc.contributor.authorZhang, H
 
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHS
 
dc.contributor.authorFok, SFS
 
dc.contributor.authorZhai, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorYung, RWH
 
dc.contributor.authorChow, EY
 
dc.contributor.authorAu, KL
 
dc.contributor.authorChan, EYT
 
dc.contributor.authorLim, W
 
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSM
 
dc.contributor.authorHe, F
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, YL
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:48:21Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:48:21Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chemokines play important roles in inflammation and antiviral action. We examined whether polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig affect the susceptibility to and outcome of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: We tested the polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig for their associations with SARS in 495 Hong Kong Chinese SARS patients and 578 controls. Then we tried to confirm the results in 356 Beijing Chinese SARS patients and 367 controls. Results: RANTES -28 G allele was associated with SARS susceptibility in Hong Kong Chinese (P < 0.0001, OR = 2.80, 95%CI:2.11-3.71). Individuals with RANTES -28 CG and GG genotypes had a 3.28-fold (95%CI:2.32-4.64) and 3.06-fold (95%CI:1.47-6.39) increased risk of developing SARS respectively (P < 0.0001). This -28 G allele conferred risk of death in a gene-dosage dependent manner (P = 0.014) with CG and GG individuals having a 2.12-fold (95% CI: 1.11-4.06) and 4.01-fold (95% CI: 1.30-12.4) increased risk. For the replication of RANTES data in Beijing Chinese, the -28 G allele was not associated with susceptibility to SARS. However, -28 CG (OR = 4.27, 95%CI:1.64-11.1) and GG (OR = 3.34, 95%CI:0.37-30.7) were associated with admission to intensive care units or death due to SARS (P = 0.011). Conclusion: RANTES -28 G allele plays a role in the pathogenesis of SARS. © 2007 Ng et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationBmc Infectious Diseases, 2007, v. 7 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-7-50
 
dc.identifier.citeulike1355486
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2334-7-50
 
dc.identifier.hkuros128416
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247617800001
 
dc.identifier.issn1471-2334
2013 Impact Factor: 2.561
2013 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.420
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid17540042
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34347374296
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78916
 
dc.identifier.volume7
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcinfectdis/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom
 
dc.relation.ispartofBMC Infectious Diseases
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.rightsB M C Infectious Diseases. Copyright © BioMed Central Ltd.
 
dc.titleThe association of RANTES polymorphism with severe acute respiratory syndrome in Hong Kong and Beijing Chinese
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Law, HKW</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Zhang, H</contributor.author>
<contributor.author>Wong, WHS</contributor.author>
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<contributor.author>Zhai, Y</contributor.author>
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<description.abstract>Background: Chemokines play important roles in inflammation and antiviral action. We examined whether polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig affect the susceptibility to and outcome of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: We tested the polymorphisms of RANTES, IP-10 and Mig for their associations with SARS in 495 Hong Kong Chinese SARS patients and 578 controls. Then we tried to confirm the results in 356 Beijing Chinese SARS patients and 367 controls. Results: RANTES -28 G allele was associated with SARS susceptibility in Hong Kong Chinese (P &lt; 0.0001, OR = 2.80, 95%CI:2.11-3.71). Individuals with RANTES -28 CG and GG genotypes had a 3.28-fold (95%CI:2.32-4.64) and 3.06-fold (95%CI:1.47-6.39) increased risk of developing SARS respectively (P &lt; 0.0001). This -28 G allele conferred risk of death in a gene-dosage dependent manner (P = 0.014) with CG and GG individuals having a 2.12-fold (95% CI: 1.11-4.06) and 4.01-fold (95% CI: 1.30-12.4) increased risk. For the replication of RANTES data in Beijing Chinese, the -28 G allele was not associated with susceptibility to SARS. However, -28 CG (OR = 4.27, 95%CI:1.64-11.1) and GG (OR = 3.34, 95%CI:0.37-30.7) were associated with admission to intensive care units or death due to SARS (P = 0.011). Conclusion: RANTES -28 G allele plays a role in the pathogenesis of SARS. &#169; 2007 Ng et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.</description.abstract>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Princess Margaret Hospital Hong Kong
  3. Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital
  4. Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine
  5. United Christian Hospital Hong Kong
  6. Government Virus Unit