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Article: Genomic evidence for antibiotic resistance genes of actinomycetes as origins of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria simply because actinomycetes are more ancestral than pathogenic bacteria

TitleGenomic evidence for antibiotic resistance genes of actinomycetes as origins of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria simply because actinomycetes are more ancestral than pathogenic bacteria
Authors
Issue Date2006
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mehy
Citation
Medical Hypotheses, 2006, v. 67 n. 6, p. 1297-1304 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough in silico analysis have suggested that the antibiotic resistance genes in actinomycetes appear to be the origins of some antibiotic resistance genes, we have shown that recent horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes from actinomycetes to other medically important bacteria have not taken place. Although it has been speculated in Benveniste and Davies' attractive hypothesis that antibiotic resistance genes of actinomycetes are origins of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria because the actinomycetes require mechanisms such as metabolic enzymes (encoded by the antibiotic resistance genes) to degrade the antibiotics they produce or to transport the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells, this hypothesis has never been proven. Both the phylogenetic tree constructed using 16S rRNA gene sequences and that constructed using concatenated amino acid sequences of 15 housekeeping genes extracted from 90 bacterial genomes showed that the actinomycetes is more ancestral to most other bacteria, including the pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and Chlamydia species. Furthermore, the tetracycline resistance gene of Bifidobacterium longum is more ancestral to those of other pathogenic bacteria and the actinomycetes, which is in line with the ancestral position of B. longum. These suggest that the evolution of antibiotic resistance genes of antibiotic-producing bacteria in general parallels the evolution of the corresponding bacteria. The ancestral position of the antibiotic resistance genes in actinomycetes is probably unrelated to the fact that they produce antibiotics, but simply because actinomycetes are more ancestral than pathogenic bacteria. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78898
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.136
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.464
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWoo, PCYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, SKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Yen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYuen, Kyen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:48:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:48:09Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_HK
dc.identifier.citationMedical Hypotheses, 2006, v. 67 n. 6, p. 1297-1304en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0306-9877en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78898-
dc.description.abstractAlthough in silico analysis have suggested that the antibiotic resistance genes in actinomycetes appear to be the origins of some antibiotic resistance genes, we have shown that recent horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance genes from actinomycetes to other medically important bacteria have not taken place. Although it has been speculated in Benveniste and Davies' attractive hypothesis that antibiotic resistance genes of actinomycetes are origins of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria because the actinomycetes require mechanisms such as metabolic enzymes (encoded by the antibiotic resistance genes) to degrade the antibiotics they produce or to transport the antibiotics outside the bacterial cells, this hypothesis has never been proven. Both the phylogenetic tree constructed using 16S rRNA gene sequences and that constructed using concatenated amino acid sequences of 15 housekeeping genes extracted from 90 bacterial genomes showed that the actinomycetes is more ancestral to most other bacteria, including the pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and Chlamydia species. Furthermore, the tetracycline resistance gene of Bifidobacterium longum is more ancestral to those of other pathogenic bacteria and the actinomycetes, which is in line with the ancestral position of B. longum. These suggest that the evolution of antibiotic resistance genes of antibiotic-producing bacteria in general parallels the evolution of the corresponding bacteria. The ancestral position of the antibiotic resistance genes in actinomycetes is probably unrelated to the fact that they produce antibiotics, but simply because actinomycetes are more ancestral than pathogenic bacteria. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/mehyen_HK
dc.relation.ispartofMedical Hypothesesen_HK
dc.subject.meshActinobacteria - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshAmino Acid Sequenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshAnti-Bacterial Agents - metabolism - pharmacologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshBacteria - pathogenicityen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiological Evolutionen_HK
dc.subject.meshDrug Resistance, Microbial - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshGenes, Bacterialen_HK
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Ribosomal, 16S - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleGenomic evidence for antibiotic resistance genes of actinomycetes as origins of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria simply because actinomycetes are more ancestral than pathogenic bacteriaen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0306-9877&volume=67&spage=1297&epage=1304&date=2006&atitle=Genomic+evidence+for+antibiotic+resistance+genes+of+actinomycetes+as+origins+of+antibiotic+resistance+genes+in+pathogenic+bacteria+simply+because+actinomycetes+are+more+ancestral+than+pathogenic+bacteriaen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWoo, PCY:pcywoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, SKP:skplau@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYuen, Ky:kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWoo, PCY=rp00430en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, SKP=rp00486en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, Ky=rp00366en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mehy.2005.12.053en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16824692en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33748977433en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros123237en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33748977433&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume67en_HK
dc.identifier.issue6en_HK
dc.identifier.spage1297en_HK
dc.identifier.epage1304en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000242561200006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, PCY=7201801340en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, SKP=7401596211en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHuang, Y=35597414700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYuen, Ky=36078079100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike4722586-

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