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Article: Evolutionary insights into the ecology of coronaviruses

TitleEvolutionary insights into the ecology of coronaviruses
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/
Citation
Journal Of Virology, 2007, v. 81 n. 8, p. 4012-4020 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough many novel members of the Coronaviridae have recently been recognized in different species, the ecology of coronaviruses has not been established. Our study indicates that bats harbor a much wider diversity of coronaviruses than any other animal species. Dating of different coronavirus lineages suggests that bat coronaviruses are older than those recognized in other animals and that the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus was directly derived from viruses from wild animals in wet markets of southern China. Furthermore, the most closely related bat and SARS coronaviruses diverged in 1986, an estimated divergence time of 17 years prior to the outbreak, suggesting that there may have been transmission via an unknown intermediate host. Analysis of lineage-specific selection pressure also indicated that only SARS coronaviruses in civets and humans were under significant positive selection, also demonstrating a recent interspecies transmission. Analysis of population dynamics revealed that coronavirus populations in bats have constant population growth, while viruses from all other hosts show epidemic-like increases in population. These results indicate that diverse coronaviruses are endemic in different bat species, with repeated introductions to other animals and occasional establishment in other species. Our findings suggest that bats are likely the natural hosts for all presently known coronavirus lineages and that all coronaviruses recognized in other species were derived from viruses residing in bats. Further surveillance of bat and other animal populations is needed to fully describe the ecology and evolution of this virus family. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78892
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.606
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.347
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVijaykrishna, Den_HK
dc.contributor.authorSmith, GJDen_HK
dc.contributor.authorZhang, JXen_HK
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGuan, Yen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:48:04Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:48:04Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Virology, 2007, v. 81 n. 8, p. 4012-4020en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0022-538Xen_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/78892-
dc.description.abstractAlthough many novel members of the Coronaviridae have recently been recognized in different species, the ecology of coronaviruses has not been established. Our study indicates that bats harbor a much wider diversity of coronaviruses than any other animal species. Dating of different coronavirus lineages suggests that bat coronaviruses are older than those recognized in other animals and that the human severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus was directly derived from viruses from wild animals in wet markets of southern China. Furthermore, the most closely related bat and SARS coronaviruses diverged in 1986, an estimated divergence time of 17 years prior to the outbreak, suggesting that there may have been transmission via an unknown intermediate host. Analysis of lineage-specific selection pressure also indicated that only SARS coronaviruses in civets and humans were under significant positive selection, also demonstrating a recent interspecies transmission. Analysis of population dynamics revealed that coronavirus populations in bats have constant population growth, while viruses from all other hosts show epidemic-like increases in population. These results indicate that diverse coronaviruses are endemic in different bat species, with repeated introductions to other animals and occasional establishment in other species. Our findings suggest that bats are likely the natural hosts for all presently known coronavirus lineages and that all coronaviruses recognized in other species were derived from viruses residing in bats. Further surveillance of bat and other animal populations is needed to fully describe the ecology and evolution of this virus family. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://jvi.asm.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Virologyen_HK
dc.rightsJournal of Virology. Copyright © American Society for Microbiology.en_HK
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_HK
dc.subject.meshBase Sequenceen_HK
dc.subject.meshBiodiversityen_HK
dc.subject.meshBirds - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCatsen_HK
dc.subject.meshCattleen_HK
dc.subject.meshChiroptera - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCoronaviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - physiologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshCoronaviridae Infections - transmission - veterinary - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirs - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_HK
dc.subject.meshEvolution, Molecularen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_HK
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_HK
dc.subject.meshRNA, Viral - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshRectum - virologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, DNAen_HK
dc.subject.meshSequence Homologyen_HK
dc.subject.meshViverridae - virologyen_HK
dc.titleEvolutionary insights into the ecology of coronavirusesen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0022-538X&volume=81&spage=4012&epage=4020&date=2007&atitle=Evolutionary+insights+into+the+ecology+of+Coronavirusesen_HK
dc.identifier.emailSmith, GJD: gjsmith@hkucc1.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailZhang, JX: zhangajx@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailGuan, Y: yguan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authoritySmith, GJD=rp00444en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, JX=rp00413en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityGuan, Y=rp00397en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/JVI.02605-06en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid17267506en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34247133132en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros130788en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34247133132&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume81en_HK
dc.identifier.issue8en_HK
dc.identifier.spage4012en_HK
dc.identifier.epage4020en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000245692900033-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVijaykrishna, D=12752817700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmith, GJD=8344015800en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, JX=12752135600en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, H=26643315400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGuan, Y=7202924055en_HK

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